Mobileread
MOBI size, uploading to Amazon
#1  yuxi_kelly 01-04-2011, 01:15 AM
Hi, dear all,

I send a 4M MOBI to my client. But she said as below"
"Can you please reconvert the attached title for mobi? The previous converted file was fine, but it was too large for uploading to Amazon"

So I want to know: What is the top size for a mobi if it can be uploaded to Amazon?
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#2  wallcraft 01-04-2011, 01:37 AM
So far as I know, there isn't a maximum size. However, there are (if the following is up to date) file size limits for some price ranges, from Enter or Change Royalty Option and List Price:
Quote
In addition, to be eligible for the 35 percent Royalty option, books with a file size greater than 3 megabytes up to 10 megabytes must also have a list price of at least $1.99 (1.25 GBP), and digital books with a file size of 10 megabytes or greater must have a list price of at least $2.99 (1.49 GBP).
There are also charges to the publisher ($0.15 or £0.10 per MB) under the standard 70% option. So publishers, and Amazon, generally like smaller ebooks over larger ones.

EDIT: if you are using kindlegen see Kindlestrip Python script and AppleScript wrapper.
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#3  pdurrant 01-08-2011, 08:43 AM
Quote yuxi_kelly
Hi, dear all,

I send a 4M MOBI to my client. But she said as below"
"Can you please reconvert the attached title for mobi? The previous converted file was fine, but it was too large for uploading to Amazon"

So I want to know: What is the top size for a mobi if it can be uploaded to Amazon?
If you're compiling it with the latest Kindlegen, be aware that a zipped copy of the source files is appended to the end of the file, pretty much doubling the size of the output file. See this thread: http://www.mobileread.com/forums/showthread.php?t=96903

which also has download links for a python script to remove the source files.
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#4  DreamWriter 01-08-2011, 04:24 PM
pdurrant (or anyone else), do you know the difference between the -C2 (Kindle huffdic compression) command-line option in KindleGen versus the -C1 (standard DOC compression) option?

I've tried both, and the -C2 produces a slightly smaller file than -C1. I can't tell any difference in the quality of the two .mobi files produced, as far as how they look on the Kindle. Just curious what the differences may be, without getting too technical.
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#5  pdurrant 01-08-2011, 04:32 PM
Quote DreamWriter
do you know the difference between the -C2 (Kindle huffdic compression) command-line option in KindleGen versus the -C1 (standard DOC compression) option?
It affects the compression algorithm used on the text. The huffdic algorithm, in general, will compress more than the standard DOC compression. If your book is text only, it'll probably make quite a bit of difference. But if most of the size of your book is from the illustrations, the effect will be less noticeable.

I'd always use the huddfic compression for a file I'm uploading to Amazon. But while I'm tweaking a book and testing it, I always use -c0 (no compression), as it's so much quicker to compile the book.
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#6  DreamWriter 01-08-2011, 05:38 PM
Thanks for your helpful reply! The book does have four graphics, so that may explain why -C2 doesn't reduce the .mobi file size all that much (from 977KB using C1 to 910KB using C2).

When I email the .mobi file to Amazon for conversion, the .azw file comes back to me at 464KB. I'm guessing that's because the source files were stripped from the .mobi, but I don't really know. Thanks again!
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#7  pdurrant 01-08-2011, 05:54 PM
Quote DreamWriter
Thanks for your helpful reply! The book does have four graphics, so that may explain why -C2 doesn't reduce the .mobi file size all that much (from 977KB using C1 to 910KB using C2).

When I email the .mobi file to Amazon for conversion, the .azw file comes back to me at 464KB. I'm guessing that's because the source files were stripped from the .mobi, but I don't really know. Thanks again!
I suspect that the pictures you're including are too big, and that Amazon is reducing their size (if JEPGs, by reducing their quality). Pictures in Kindle ebooks can't be more the 127KB.
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#8  DreamWriter 01-08-2011, 06:09 PM
Thanks for mentioning the 127KB limit on graphics, but I had already checked to make sure they're within the limits. The cover is 127KB, and the four graphics are 63KB, 97KB, 60KB, and 51KB. I had forgotten, but there's also another graphic used throughout the book (43 times), and that one's 24KB.

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#9  pdurrant 01-08-2011, 06:44 PM
Quote DreamWriter
Thanks for mentioning the 127KB limit on graphics, but I had already checked to make sure they're within the limits. The cover is 127KB, and the four graphics are 63KB, 97KB, 60KB, and 51KB. I had forgotten, but there's also another graphic used throughout the book (43 times), and that one's 24KB.
So that's 422KB of graphics in a 464KB book - the text takes just 42KB. Note that without the huffdic compression it looks like it'd take 109KB. That should how much more efficient the huffdic compression is.

And yes, it does seem that Amazon must be stripping off the source files for you. Interesting. I might have to experiment with that.
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#10  DreamWriter 01-08-2011, 07:06 PM
The .mobi file that I sent to Amazon for conversion (via Kindle email) was compiled by me with no options on the KindleGen command line. I assume that's actually the -c1 (standard DOC compression) option because I tried -c1 later and it created the same-sized .mobi file as with no option specified.

The .mobi file I sent Amazon was 977KB and it came back in .azw format at 464KB. Happy experimenting!
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