Mobileread
New Leaf Nominations for November • If Books Could Kill, Thrilling Stories
#11  gmw 10-02-2020, 09:27 AM
So the following has been on my list for quite a while. I've read some of his humorous works and thoroughly enjoyed them (and even nominated one of them here), but I have not yet tried any of his murder mysteries, so...


I nominate The Girl in the Ice by Robert Bryndza (first of the Detective Erika Foster mysteries). (2016)

Blurb from Goodreads:
Quote
When a young boy discovers the body of a woman beneath a thick sheet of ice in a South London park, Detective Erika Foster is called in to lead the murder investigation.

The victim, a beautiful young socialite, appeared to have the perfect life. Yet when Erika begins to dig deeper, she starts to connect the dots between the murder and the killings of three prostitutes, all found strangled, hands bound and dumped in water around London.

What dark secrets is the girl in the ice hiding?

As Erika inches closer to uncovering the truth, the killer is closing in on Erika.

The last investigation Erika led went badly wrong… resulting in the death of her husband. With her career hanging by a thread, Erika must now battle her own personal demons as well as a killer more deadly than any she’s faced before. But will she get to him before he strikes again?
417 pages (357 ADE)

Example prices: Kobo US $2.99, Kobo CA $3.99, Kobo UK £1.99, Kobo AU $3.99.
Reply 

#12  Luffy 10-02-2020, 11:08 AM
I second The Girl in the Ice by Robert Bryndza.
Reply 

#13  Catlady 10-02-2020, 12:27 PM
I nominate Dragonwyck by Anya Seton (1944, 419 pp.).

Quote
A novel of seduction, mystery, and danger set in New York’s Hudson Valley in the nineteenth century, by the author of Foxfire.

There was, on the Hudson, a way of life such as this, and there was a house not unlike Dragonwyck . . .

In the spring of 1844, the Wells family receives a letter from a distant relative, the wealthy landowner Nicholas Van Ryn. He has invited one of their daughters for an extended visit at his Hudson Valley estate, Dragonwyck. Eighteen-year-old Miranda, bored with her local suitors and commonplace life on the farm, leaps at the chance for an escape. She immediately falls under the spell of both the master and his mansion, mesmerized by the Gothic towers, flowering gardens, and luxurious lifestyle—but unaware of the dark, terrible secrets that await.

Anya Seton masterfully tells the heart-stopping story of a remarkable woman, her remarkable passions, and the mystery that resides in the magnificent hallways of Dragonwyck.
Available in all relevant countries; available as e-book and audiobook; can be borrowed through Overdrive, Freading, Hoopla, and Scribd.

Amazon U.S., $2.99
Reply 

#14  CRussel 10-02-2020, 02:10 PM
Quote JSWolf
Too bad is't the 2nd book of a series or it would have been perfect to nominate.
It's still find to nominate. We don't require that folks nominate the first in a series, even though some people might hesitate to vote for a book that's not the first if they haven't already read that first. (Maybe even more so if they have, of course. )

We've had this discussion before, but it's important to reiterate that we don't restrict the nominations, nor do we denigrate ANY nomination. Full stop. Obviously, when a person nominates a book that is outside of the norm, it's useful for everyone if they add a note of explanation. For example, where a book is not the first, a simple "Yes, I know that [bookname] is the second in a series, but really, it reads fine as a standalone so don't sweat it if you haven't read the first" would be an appropriate explanation to reassure folks that they can jump right in at book #2.

A concrete example of this is a series like the Liaden Universe books where there are multiple entry points into the Universe as well as several that are standalone, and the first two books, chronologically, are not the place you want to start. (They're really, in some ways, prequels, and definitely better when you have already read one or more of the later books.)
Reply 

#15  Victoria 10-02-2020, 02:58 PM
I nominate The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, by Alexander McCall Smith. I’ve not read it, but it was enormously popular when first published, so I thought it may be fun for us.

From Amazon:

This first novel in Alexander McCall Smith’s widely acclaimed The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency series tells the story of the delightfully cunning and enormously engaging Precious Ramotswe, who is drawn to her profession to “help people with problems in their lives.” Immediately upon setting up shop in a small storefront in Gaborone, she is hired to track down a missing husband, uncover a con man, and follow a wayward daughter. But the case that tugs at her heart, and lands her in danger, is a missing eleven-year-old boy, who may have been snatched by witchdoctors.

The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency received two Booker Judges’ Special Recommendations and was voted one of the International Books of the Year and the Millennium by the Times Literary Supplement.

272 pages


Overdrive
Kindle $5.99 CA
Kobo $11.99 AUD; $7.99 USD; $5.99 CA; £4.99 GB
Reply 

#16  issybird 10-02-2020, 03:28 PM
Quote Victoria
I nominate The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, by Alexander McCall Smith. I’ve not read it, but it was enormously popular when first published, so I thought it may be fun for us.

From Amazon:

This first novel in Alexander McCall Smith’s widely acclaimed The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency series tells the story of the delightfully cunning and enormously engaging Precious Ramotswe, who is drawn to her profession to “help people with problems in their lives.” Immediately upon setting up shop in a small storefront in Gaborone, she is hired to track down a missing husband, uncover a con man, and follow a wayward daughter. But the case that tugs at her heart, and lands her in danger, is a missing eleven-year-old boy, who may have been snatched by witchdoctors.

The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency received two Booker Judges’ Special Recommendations and was voted one of the International Books of the Year and the Millennium by the Times Literary Supplement.

272 pages


Overdrive
Kindle $5.99 CA
Kobo $11.99 AUD; $7.99 USD; $5.99 CA; £4.99 GB
That was the MR Book Club selection in February 2017, just as an FYI.
Reply 

#17  CRussel 10-02-2020, 03:33 PM
Quote issybird
That was the MR Book Club selection in February 2017, just as an FYI.
Which, sadly, makes it ineligible. An interesting book and I quite enjoyed the first few books in the series, though I eventually tired of them. So you have your ticket back, Victoria.
Reply 

#18  Victoria 10-02-2020, 03:59 PM
Ah, sorry about that!! I forgot to check Darzin’s list. I’ll go back to the drawing board. ( I’m glad to hear it was fun though )
Reply 

#19  issybird 10-02-2020, 04:14 PM
Quote Victoria
Ah, sorry about that!! I forgot to check Darzin’s list. I’ll go back to the drawing board. ( I’m glad to hear it was fun though )
If you read it, you should check out the discussion thread. There were, ah, differing opinions.
Reply 

#20  CRussel 10-02-2020, 05:49 PM
Quote issybird
If you read it, you should check out the discussion thread. There were, ah, differing opinions.
Yes, there, ah, were.
Reply 

 « First  « Prev Next »  Last »  (2/5)
Today's Posts | Search this Thread | Login | Register