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What Makes a Reader
#1  leebase 09-03-2020, 10:25 AM
Do we KNOW?

Are you SURE?

We talk like we are sure and that we know. But, I'm thinking "not so much". I'm thinking "those who like to read" are like "those who like sports" or "those who like hunting and fishing".

There are poor people who love to read. There are people who had parents that weren't readers who love to read.

And vice versa. Parents who read beget kids who don't.

I was born a reader. Even my love of watching tv and playing video games never kept me from also reading.

My sister is not a reader. Never has been (I mean, she CAN read).

I think schools should foster the OPPORTUNITY for kids to not only learn to read but learn to LOVE reading. I just don't think it's really anything about the schools as to whether or not a particular kids comes to love reading.

But, I could be wrong. What say you
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#2  JSWolf 09-03-2020, 10:27 AM
An eInk screen, some electronics, some plastic, and the software makes a Reader.
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#3  4691mls 09-03-2020, 01:20 PM
Quote leebase
Do we KNOW?

Are you SURE?

We talk like we are sure and that we know. But, I'm thinking "not so much". I'm thinking "those who like to read" are like "those who like sports" or "those who like hunting and fishing".

There are poor people who love to read. There are people who had parents that weren't readers who love to read.

And vice versa. Parents who read beget kids who don't.

I was born a reader. Even my love of watching tv and playing video games never kept me from also reading.

My sister is not a reader. Never has been (I mean, she CAN read).

I think schools should foster the OPPORTUNITY for kids to not only learn to read but learn to LOVE reading. I just don't think it's really anything about the schools as to whether or not a particular kids comes to love reading.

But, I could be wrong. What say you

I think early exposure to books as a positive thing (such as someone at home reading fun stories to young children) probably helps, but some people just aren't that into it. I always read more than my sibling even though we grew up in the same home.

Somebody took me fishing once or twice when I was a kid, but I wasn't inspired to try it again. Just not my thing.
I'm too klutzy to ever be good at sports so it's probably just as well I'm not interested in them.
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#4  ps67 09-03-2020, 01:40 PM
I don't know: I was born in a house full of books and I became someone who reads a lot, the same for my brother.

My mother used to give coloring books or similar things to all the children who came within range but not many of them (almost none) became readers.

I also always thought that reading could not be imposed but a colleague of mine told me that as a child she did not want to read anything, she was forced to read a children's book by her parents, a book she had to read for school, and, to her surprise, she became so passionate that she became a reader.
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#5  Sirtel 09-03-2020, 02:58 PM
I think it's inborn, like most other preferences and likes. I'm a passionate reader since early childhood (in fact, I don't remember a time when I didn't read), but neither of my parents were, and while my sister has read for pleasure occasionally, she has never been an avid reader. Her daughters aren't either. And we all (me, my sister and my nieces) grew up in a home with lots of books.

As to parents reading with their children, I'm not sure it has anything to do with it. I don't remember my parents reading with me, but as I could read when I was 3 years old, there was no particular need for them to do so. I loved to read and read all the time, whatever I could get my hands on. I read grown-up books before I was ten. Children's books too, of course. I don't recall ever needing or wanting an adult's help with reading. My parents didn't try to limit my reading material in any way and for that I'm grateful.

OTOH, my nieces were read with many times when they were little, but they still didn't become readers. They're smart and educated, particularly my older niece. They just aren't interested in reading, and never have been.
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#6  JSWolf 09-03-2020, 03:20 PM
I don't recall when I started to read. I don't remember my parents reading bedtime stores. I do remember that I was able to read ahead of my grade level.
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#7  Deskisamess 09-03-2020, 04:05 PM
Early exposure for sure, and example set by family members doesn't hurt. For me, being good and fast at reading helped...I got through the SRA program faster than anyone in the class. So the positive attention from the teachers spurred me on. But what created that in me? At least to a point I think it's something we are born with, which grows given the right tools.

My parents were both readers, I grew up in a house full of books. My father worked at the local newspaper, in various departments. I don't know if that had anything to do with his love of reading. My mom was a regular visitor at the library and the bookmobile. She took me with her many times. She still reads often. I think a good deal of my dad's "education" came from his own reading. The Civil War was a favorite topic of his. Both of my parents were raised in poor poor families.

I don't remember my parents reading to us, but I spent most weekends with a great aunt and uncle, and have clear memories of being read to all the time. I still have some of my Little Golden Books...Heidi was my favorite.

My sister is a reader, not sure so much about my younger brother.

I feel like Scout from TKAM..."Now that I was compelled to think about it, reading was something that just came to me..."

I wish my MIL loved to read. They are once again quarantined in their rooms at the nursing home. She reads devotional books, but isn't one to pick up a book and get lost in it. She's having a tough time right now. 2 of Tim's sisters never read. They scoff when you recommend it as a hobby or pleasure. That makes me sad. There are no books in their homes, which bothers me. His other sister is a teacher, and she likes to read. She reads her Kindle when they take motorcycle trips.

All 4 of my kids read, and so far all the grandkids seems to like it. Our oldest is 12, and would read nonstop if he could. He is very smart, and in advanced classes this year. We gave him Tim's Paperwhite 2 a few months ago, he loves it after reading on an old original Fire.

My husband didn't enjoy reading until he got a Kindle. He had never read for pleasure until these last 10 years. That makes me very happy. He can't wait to retire so he has more time to read than just 30 minutes before bed.
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#8  twowheels 09-03-2020, 04:26 PM
I suspect that it's somewhat innate. My family didn't read -- I don't remember anybody around me reading, yet from early elementary school I remember checking out two books from the library every day, one to read in the hallways when walking to the bus, on the bus, and through the evening, and one to read the next morning on the way back. Yeah, most of it was just "junk", like the Hardy Boys, or choose your own adventure books (where I HAD to read every possible path), but even beyond that I would read everything -- milk cartons, cereal boxes, etc... I read so much that my parents would get on my case and tell me that I needed to live in the real world.

That continued until mid high school, when I got my first computer. My reading slowed down quite a bit as I spent most of that time programming, I loved it (still do, though doing it professionally isn't nearly as fun), so it was a while before I picked up the reading habit again -- starting with my Newton MP100, where I found Project Gutenberg books and started reading those on my device (and those after that), and it really kicked into overdrive again when I bought my K3, where I went back to multiple books per month. There have been periods of more or less, but I've been back at it ever since and really wish that job/chores didn't take so much time, but maybe some day when I retire I can go back to "two books per day" (well, probably less, most of what I read now is a bit more complex). I did manage to convince my wife on our vacation last week to reserve some time to just read -- we're always just go-go-go, and it felt good to just put a folding chair next to a river and read for a few hours.

EDIT: My favorite "teacher" in high school was the school librarian, and my elective class was to work in the library, where I implemented a dBase III database w/ a barcode scanner to track checkouts and to have an online card-catalog, and then they hired me for the summer to work in the school councilors office typing in the entire card catalog, and then putting the little barcode stickers in every book. I have to admit to having entered a Pepsi can or two into the catalog too! I would spend all of my lunches in the library where my friends would talk about scifi books, and would ditch all of the school pep rallies to hang out in the library, which he allowed me to do even though he wasn't supposed to -- haha -- I got caught once though because I got an award from the business department for being the fastest typist. I didn't expect anything since I was a junior and it was supposed to be for seniors!
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#9  Deskisamess 09-03-2020, 04:33 PM
Cereal boxes, milk cartons, shampoo bottles, toothpaste, anything with a label. It was a compulsion. I had to. Even with always having my cell phone with me, I still keep a book in my car. Right now it's Jane Eyre.
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#10  JSWolf 09-03-2020, 04:39 PM
Quote Deskisamess
Cereal boxes, milk cartons, shampoo bottles, toothpaste, anything with a label. It was a compulsion. I had to. Even with always having my cell phone with me, I still keep a book in my car. Right now it's Jane Eyre.
I used to read the cereal box while having breakfast. I liked the boxes with the puzzels on the back. I would finish them before finishing breakfast.
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