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Scam from jerks claiming to be Apple CS
#21  DiapDealer 12-04-2019, 06:21 PM
I understand they may not want to reject calls. But that's simply not an option in this day and age. Something WILL change soon, and telcos will have to adjust. Even if it's just providing the end-user with the option to have more granularity in choosing what they want to reject. The notion that today's telcos couldn't prevent overseas fraud-farms from spoofing phone numbers local to their targets just isn't realistic. They can already do it. They just haven't figured out the best way to sell it as a feature to the end-user.
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#22  pwalker8 12-05-2019, 07:58 AM
Quote DiapDealer
I understand they may not want to reject calls. But that's simply not an option in this day and age. Something WILL change soon, and telcos will have to adjust. Even if it's just providing the end-user with the option to have more granularity in choosing what they want to reject. The notion that today's telcos couldn't prevent overseas fraud-farms from spoofing phone numbers local to their targets just isn't realistic. They can already do it. They just haven't figured out the best way to sell it as a feature to the end-user.
International telephone calls work because of interconnecting treaties and agreements in place between countries. There are a few bad actor foreign telephone companies out there, but it mostly works. Back when the 1-800 spoof scam (you call a 1-800 number which forwards you to a 1-900 number in a different country) was popular, I got a pretty good education on why telephone companies couldn't spot the scam and refuse to pay the foreign telephone company. The basic answer is legally they can't.

As far as interactive fraud detection goes, that stuff is mostly after the fact. The sheer volume of calls makes real time detection much more difficult than you think. Heck, real time call rating (which is what makes pre-paid mobile telephone possible) is both expensive and hard. It took years of work and many millions of dollars to get it to working in a timely manner at the company where I worked. Yea, it's possible to put in an anti-call-spoofer system in place, but it's both expensive and runs into legal issues.
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#23  Greg Anos 12-06-2019, 06:31 AM
Quote DiapDealer
This seems very unlikely to me. Can you please elaborate on how my landline number might be "hacked"? Without hacking my landline provider's system, just how would they change where my number is being forwarded to? And how would turning off call forwarding on my landline prevent someone who later hacks my landline account (or my landline provider's system) from re-enabling call-forwarding and doing whatever they want anyway? And what kind of accounts are vulnerable to being "stolen from" with just a phone number? Even to get the second token of a 2FA protected account forwarded to someone's smart phone from a hacked landline, they'd need to crack the first password.

I'm all for being safer with your data, but your scenario doesn't sound that probable to me. I just don't believe anyone is more (or less) at risk by having their landline forwarded.

You're better off realizing (and spreading the word) that companies such as Apple and Microsoft simply don't cold-call people to avoid this kind of scam.
This actually happened to me. The provider was Frontier (formerly Verizon FIOS). How the hacker(s) got onto the Frontier system, I do not know. Once they got to my system, they used call forwarding to forward my phone number to their own smart phone (number). Then they attacked one of my retirement accounts at a big name discount brokerage. They first changed the email address to a "burner" email address of their own, and then tried to drain the account. The only thing that stopped them was the fact that they tried to pull out all the money almost immediately. That trigger the anti-fraud systems at the brokerage company (the last line of defence). I didn't know about the brokerage attack only when I received a paper "snail mail" notification.

My guess is that is came from a resume', I had sent out. (I was job hunting at the time.)

This was a very real occurrence. I checked with Frontier, and they immediately advised turning off call forwarding.
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#24  Greg Anos 12-06-2019, 06:42 AM
Yes, it's a logical "blind spot". How many land line users treat a system that is not normally thought of as part of a computer system, as a computer system subject to hacking?

I have since "hardened" all my financial accounts, with analog interlocks.

(Some system here. I can't edit a post after 5 minutes I add the rest as a quick post, which doesn't show up. So I have to add another post to the thread. Shrug.)
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