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Scam from jerks claiming to be Apple CS
#11  crane3 12-01-2019, 01:07 PM
Quote OtinG
The irony of your statement is that we Apple users are far less likely to have a real issue with data breaching, as opposed to Google users who can pretty much be assured that Google itself will data mine their devices and apps and sell it to the highest bidder. That is why know these are scams, because Apple's walled garden works and they are not evil to the core like Google, Facebook, etc. MS isn’t evil, but they are very sloppy and stupid. So chuckle all you want to my friend, while bad guys read through all of your personal data and transactions.
I got 2 calls from 'apple' & no msg was left on my answering machine; considered that it was a scam like the ones pretending to be from the SSA.

Apple is not above 'mining' their customers' data. I received an email that something on my account got changed; waited about 2 weeks before doing anything then decided to check anyway.

My CC number was changed! This was the time about the big deal about chipped CC. I received a new chipped CC from a different issued by the bank who " repurchased" (?) their customers' accounts for CC; the apple account's CC# had expired during the time frame.

apple did use their big stick to obtain the replacement CC# from a different issuer. Guess an employee does go thru people's accounts for info to sell &/or change account info. I don't believe that apple is more secure than google; I now believe news stories of people getting new iphones & got them setup with other peoples data & profile.
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#12  pazos 12-01-2019, 02:21 PM
Quote OtinG
The irony of your statement is that we Apple users are far less likely to have a real issue with data breaching, as opposed to Google users who can pretty much be assured that Google itself will data mine their devices and apps and sell it to the highest bidder. That is why know these are scams, because Apple's walled garden works and they are not evil to the core like Google, Facebook, etc. MS isn’t evil, but they are very sloppy and stupid. So chuckle all you want to my friend, while bad guys read through all of your personal data and transactions.
The real difference is that Apple holds the monopoly of data mining in their devices and applications.

I, as an iPad user, I'm aware they don't sell that data to third parties like Google and Facebook do. Accordly to their TOS they can do some disclosure with some third parties but is not the same.

Anyways all these companies are using the same fingerprinting techniques to know their users.
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#13  Greg Anos 12-01-2019, 02:39 PM
Quote lazyreadr
There seems to be 100 variations of this type of fishing. It is usually only dangerous when a well targetted variant arrives.

For both landline and cellphone I have unknown numbers go immediately without ringtone to the answering machine. If it is a legitimate new caller they can use the box and I call back.

Typically scammers rarely bother to leave a message and this way they did at least not disturb me at an unconvenient time.

Turn off your call forwarding on your landline! Your number can be hacked, and forwarded to another smart phone number. Voila! Your landline is now a smart phone, under a hacker's control. And then they can steal from any account that has your land line as the only number.

First, they change your email address to a "burner" email address. then they try to withdraw! Luckily, in my case, they tried too soon, and the financial institute marked as a hack and shut down access. I only found out about it via snail mail, , ,
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#14  DiapDealer 12-01-2019, 03:53 PM
Quote Greg Anos
Turn off your call forwarding on your landline! Your number can be hacked, and forwarded to another smart phone number. Voila! Your landline is now a smart phone, under a hacker's control. And then they can steal from any account that has your land line as the only number.
This seems very unlikely to me. Can you please elaborate on how my landline number might be "hacked"? Without hacking my landline provider's system, just how would they change where my number is being forwarded to? And how would turning off call forwarding on my landline prevent someone who later hacks my landline account (or my landline provider's system) from re-enabling call-forwarding and doing whatever they want anyway? And what kind of accounts are vulnerable to being "stolen from" with just a phone number? Even to get the second token of a 2FA protected account forwarded to someone's smart phone from a hacked landline, they'd need to crack the first password.

I'm all for being safer with your data, but your scenario doesn't sound that probable to me. I just don't believe anyone is more (or less) at risk by having their landline forwarded.

You're better off realizing (and spreading the word) that companies such as Apple and Microsoft simply don't cold-call people to avoid this kind of scam.
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#15  tomsem 12-02-2019, 10:19 PM
Quote DiapDealer
You're better off realizing (and spreading the word) that companies such as Apple and Microsoft simply don't cold-call people to avoid this kind of scam.
I realize this, but still it was spooky getting the iCloud scam call (on our message machine, we don’t pick up for unknown callers) less than 12 hours after creating an iCloud account to use with my wife’s new iPhone (without any previous Apple device registered to her). I had to talk myself down.

I really don’t understand how they can spoof our own land line number (or any number for that matter). Caller ID implementation seems stuck in the 1980s.
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#16  purplepeacock186 12-03-2019, 09:29 AM
These scammers have been around for ages. I have heard about them at least since 2 or 3 years ago. People should be aware of them now. I have just Googled about this Apple scam and found some reports have been filed since last year at https://www.whycall.me/800-100-9009.html. Be on extra guard and keep spreading the word to family.
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#17  DiapDealer 12-03-2019, 10:24 AM
Quote tomsem
I really don’t understand how they can spoof our own land line number (or any number for that matter). Caller ID implementation seems stuck in the 1980s.
There are several valid situations where caller id needs to show a number different than the one the call was made from. So they can't just shut all "spoofing" down across the board. I agree, though, that there's no reason (technologically-speaking) why it couldn't be handled in such a way that people using the feature for nefarious purposes would be shut down.

I for one, believe that there should be a away for residential customers to choose to reject direct calls that originate in another country.

A screening telephone system has made my land-line much more user friendly again. White-listed contacts ring through with no issue, black-listed numbers are dropped with no ring, and unknown callers don't start ringing until they record their name and push the pound key. And I can easily white-list/drop/black-list with the touch of a button. My phone is getting hundreds of calls a week, but it almost never rings unless it's someone I actually want to speak to.
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#18  pwalker8 12-04-2019, 09:52 AM
Quote DiapDealer
There are several valid situations where caller id needs to show a number different than the one the call was made from. So they can't just shut all "spoofing" down across the board. I agree, though, that there's no reason (technologically-speaking) why it couldn't be handled in such a way that people using the feature for nefarious purposes would be shut down.

I for one, believe that there should be a away for residential customers to choose to reject direct calls that originate in another country.

A screening telephone system has made my land-line much more user friendly again. White-listed contacts ring through with no issue, black-listed numbers are dropped with no ring, and unknown callers don't start ringing until they record their name and push the pound key. And I can easily white-list/drop/black-list with the touch of a button. My phone is getting hundreds of calls a week, but it almost never rings unless it's someone I actually want to speak to.
Simply put, the caller id information is included in the call record and is put there by the originating switch. For companies that have their own PBX, the caller id information is supplied by the PBX. Scammers generally hid behind a PBX, of course most companies do the same.
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#19  DiapDealer 12-04-2019, 10:20 AM
Quote pwalker8
Simply put, the caller id information is included in the call record and is put there by the originating switch. For companies that have their own PBX, the caller id information is supplied by the PBX. Scammers generally hid behind a PBX, of course most companies do the same.
Exactly. That's why it can't just be shut down altogether. But there's no reason (technologically) that they can't be stopped from supplying caller id numbers that include area codes and exchanges that they're not actually responsible for.

I make all of our outgoing calls from various numbers spoof the main number of our business for caller id purposes. All calls look like they originated from our main business number. But all those other numbers that are spoofing our main number are still under our control. And our service provider KNOWS this.

There's no reason telco's can't reject calls that are providing caller id info for numbers they don't own/lease/control. It wouldn't be difficult for software to verify that the actual number and the spoofed caller id number are in fact both controlled/owned/leased by the same entities.
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#20  pwalker8 12-04-2019, 03:42 PM
Quote DiapDealer
Exactly. That's why it can't just be shut down altogether. But there's no reason (technologically) that they can't be stopped from supplying caller id numbers that include area codes and exchanges that they're not actually responsible for.

I make all of our outgoing calls from various numbers spoof the main number of our business for caller id purposes. All calls look like they originated from our main business number. But all those other numbers that are spoofing our main number are still under our control. And our service provider KNOWS this.

There's no reason telco's can't reject calls that are providing caller id info for numbers they don't own/lease/control. It wouldn't be difficult for software to verify that the actual number and the spoofed caller id number are in fact both controlled/owned/leased by the same entities.
I would suggest that most of those scam calls are from PBX's based outside the US. In my various jobs working as a developer for large telecommunications companies I've work both fraud and billing (i.e. working with the call records). I've also done some switch programming. On the surface it seems simple, but when you are working with calls that are international, or are coming from some small mom and pop telecom with a 30 year old MTSO, the details get pretty complex pretty quickly.

A telephone company rejecting a call because of caller id info is seriously not an option. Most telephone companies are heavily regulated and were even more regulated 20 years ago. Telephone companies seriously don't want to explain why the call to the police department didn't go through because the caller id information was not valid. For that matter, law enforcement agencies don't want telephone companies to reject spoofed caller id, mostly because they use that particular feature rather heavily.
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