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Who writes on an e-reader? Asking advice.
#1  deleted 03-18-2020, 05:32 AM
Hello writers!
Does anyone write using an ereader?
Primarily, I mean writing drafts in cursive style but I'd like to hear from those who type onto an ereader too.


I write non-fiction short stories...
I do the first two drafts pencil on paper.
I used my ereader for copy-editing purposes. But as I've broken the screen on my old device, I'm excited by the potential to write on the ereader (I'm particularly considering Onyx Note Pro).

My work flow involves writing on the right hand side of a notebook, and keeping the notes that related to my writing on the left hand page. Many ereaders nowadays have the split screen function. I wonder if I can copy my method with an ereader...

I've seen many promotion type videos over the years of people writing on ereaders, but the fact that the videos show people writing gigantic letters has left me harbouring disbelief as to whether anyone actually does use an ereader this way.

Is the aforementioned practical?
I've got concerns about the user friendliness of the filing system, how notes are stored etc. And just using the device to write in general.

Can anyone enlighten me?
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#2  JSWolf 03-18-2020, 05:38 AM
Why would anyone use a Reader to write a book? It's highly inefficient if it could even be done.
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#3  deleted 03-18-2020, 07:39 AM
Quote JSWolf
Why would anyone use a Reader to write a book? It's highly inefficient if it could even be done.
Are you aware that there are ereaders designed specifically for writing? Personally, I'm not sure whether they are gimmicks or not - it's one of the reasons I'm asking.

You may have noticed that I write by hand [because I said so above] and this does mean it's slow for me to produce things [which is true of writing in any case]... however, I find the slower more meditative process of hand writing better for tapping into creativity and cutting out the garbage that comes when one can type faster than one can think...

Well, in short, it works for me, and from that point of view it's more efficient. People were writing by hand for over a thousand years after all. It worked v.well.

Why an e-reader? Because I can backup all my writing and not lose it; the usual, 'won't have to carry half a dozen different note pads'. I could also potentially use the hand writing to ascii function which would cut out a step in my process. Basically, use technology to aid what I already do.

But your question is a tangent anyway... back to mine. Who wants to bite?
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#4  rjwse@aol.com 03-18-2020, 07:57 AM
I am currently doing quite a bit of writing using the calibre editor. When done, it is already (of course) a finished epub. To print it out is a matter of conversion to Pdf. I have arrived at this circuitous route via many, many years of other methods. I began with Gregg stenography and manual typewriter with (quite literal) cut and paste. I visited Bell Labs near Holmdel New Jersey in '68 and saw the first forays into UNIX. Before DOS I wrote one of the owners' manuals for the Texas Instruments early computers, then later taught the very first relational database at a college near NASA. CPM advanced the Wordstar diamond pattern at this time, requiring one 8 inch floppy to load CPM, a second to load Wordstar, a third to load the formatter. The business world flocked to the non-camel case, crippled MS DOS. The advent of ALT and function keys (added to the one and only Ctrl key) killed off the diamond, but -- believe me -- many successful professional writers still use the Wordstar command set. I remember when Borland came out with "choose your own menu" for all of its products and Microsoft sued them. Think about it: their own spreadsheet was the marketplace failure Multiplan. Does anyone use Word Perfect? Ironically, Microsoft purchased DOS, Excel. It is a convoluted world and you get to vote with your feet. For now, calibre is a real good 'word processor' for making epubs. Why use a middleman? The answer is 'what ever works for you.' Best regards, Pop
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#5  Dazrin 03-18-2020, 11:58 AM
Quote deleted
Are you aware that there are ereaders designed specifically for writing? Personally, I'm not sure whether they are gimmicks or not - it's one of the reasons I'm asking.
I know there are some e-ink devices that are meant for note taking, possibly writing, like Sony's Digital Paper Tablet or the reMarkable device but I would not call those ereaders. I'm not even sure the Sony supports epub or mobi files.

I have considered getting something like one of them for note-taking in meetings but the price tag is way too high for me to justify that. If the original NoteSlate concept had panned out I might have done that though.

https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/05/sony-and-remarkables-dueling-e-paper-tablets-are-strange-but-impressive-beasts/
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#6  JSWolf 03-18-2020, 12:18 PM
Quote deleted
Are you aware that there are ereaders designed specifically for writing? Personally, I'm not sure whether they are gimmicks or not - it's one of the reasons I'm asking.
Which Readers are designed for writing? If there are, they would not be Readers. Readers are designed for reading.
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#7  Quoth 03-18-2020, 02:20 PM
Quote JSWolf
Which Readers are designed for writing? If there are, they would not be Readers. Readers are designed for reading.
Absolutely.
Also all text editors and wordprocessors except line editors designed for teletypes (i.e. everything in the last 40 years except edlin) scroll the user interface and thus are unsuitable for an eink screen.

The eink is lovely to read on. I know you can customise some to be a monitor and buy "monitor" screens, but without special sw they would be horrible.

I write on an LCD laptop, brightness carefully adjusted. No reflected light and no daylight. I read and annotate on the eink ereader. It's MOSTLY reading, so I don't hugely miss having a decent keyboard.
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#8  Quoth 03-18-2020, 02:22 PM
Quote Dazrin
I know there are some e-ink devices that are meant for note taking, possibly writing, like Sony's Digital Paper Tablet or the reMarkable device but I would not call those ereaders. I'm not even sure the Sony supports epub or mobi files.
The Sony models are purely to annotate EXISTING PDFs. Not for content creation or editing.
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#9  Tex2002ans 03-18-2020, 04:04 PM
Quote deleted
Does anyone write using an ereader?
Primarily, I mean writing drafts in cursive style but I'd like to hear from those who type onto an ereader too.
I've seen the occasional e-ink tablet/laptop pop up on The Digital Reader:

https://the-digital-reader.com/2020/01/08/updates-from-ces-2020-1-lenovos-e-ink-laptop-hisenses-color-e-ink-smartphone-and-more/
https://the-digital-reader.com/2018/10/15/onyx-youngy-boox-sports-a-10-7-color-e-ink-screen/
https://the-digital-reader.com/2019/03/24/large-ereader-roundup-march-2018/

Unsure of how they work in actual practice. Doubt it would be a very good experience because of low DPI+CPU+refresh rates.

Back in 2017-2018, he wrote articles about Remarkable (e-ink tablet):

https://the-digital-reader.com/2017/09/17/remarkable-e-ink-writing-slate-reviews-great-tablet-not-ready-prime-time/
https://the-digital-reader.com/2018/06/10/remarkable-writing-slate-gains-battery-tweaks-in-official-update-new-epub-app-from-3rd-party-hacker/
https://the-digital-reader.com/2018/11/08/remarkable-writing-tablet-updated-with-remarkable-handwriting-ocr-feature/

Seems like he actually owns one, so perhaps he'll be willing to give an update if you contact him?

Quote deleted
Is the aforementioned practical?

I've got concerns about the user friendliness of the filing system, how notes are stored etc. And just using the device to write in general.
From what I gather, it would probably be more effective purchasing an actual tablet.

Then you have the backing of actual Android/iOS, access to all apps (not locked to a handful of clunky ones on the device, etc. etc.).
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#10  Quoth 03-18-2020, 04:52 PM
Android is worse than Windows 2.x when it comes to support for storage and printing. Depends on Android version AND app version, if SD card can be accessed. The files of some apps can't be accessed at all via USB, Wireless, BT etc.
No printing on most apps.

Apple iOS wants you to do everything via their Cloud and Apps.

The Fire is a locked down, walled in, crippled version of Android for their store.

There may be some eInk devices that use a Linux, but not much like any desktop Linux. Some use a customised Android, which is a bit crazy as the Android GUI and App programming system is unsuited for eink, but it means they don't have to develop much and can claim you can install Android apps (such as Kindle).

No, use a laptop with MacOS, Windows or Linux for content creation unless you want text editing not much more than 1991 Windows Notepad.
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