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Affect/Effect?
#1  GlenBarrington 03-16-2020, 09:24 AM
What are the rules? Grammarly is making me question my sanity on this issue.
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#2  theducks 03-16-2020, 10:12 AM
affect causes an effect (My ancient Websters 7th)
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#3  pdurrant 03-16-2020, 11:11 AM
What theducks said. In effect.
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#4  GlenBarrington 03-16-2020, 11:32 AM
Quote theducks
affect causes an effect (My ancient Websters 7th)
Oh! Thank God! I was about to loose my mind!
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#5  Dr. Drib 03-16-2020, 06:16 PM
Quote GlenBarrington
What are the rules? Grammarly is making me question my sanity on this issue.
I'm afraid the effect of the arcane rules of grammar is affecting your sanity!
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#6  Bilbo1967 03-16-2020, 06:33 PM
Quote GlenBarrington
Oh! Thank God! I was about to loose my mind!
Please tell that use of "loose" was irony.
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#7  hobnail 03-16-2020, 06:35 PM
Quote Dr. Drib
I'm afraid the effect impact of the arcane rules of grammar is affecting impacting your sanity!

Don't bother trying to figure it out; just use impact like everyone else does.
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#8  Catlady 03-17-2020, 05:04 PM
From Merriam-Webster's 11th:

Quote
Effect and affect are often confused because of their similar spelling and pronunciation. The verb affect usually has to do with pretense *she affected a cheery disposition despite feeling down*. The more common affect denotes having an effect or influence *the weather affected everyone's mood*. The verb effect goes beyond mere influence; it refers to actual achievement of a final result *the new administration hopes to effect a peace settlement*. The uncommon noun affect, which has a meaning relating to psychology, is also sometimes mistakenly used for the very common effect. In ordinary use, the noun you will want is effect *waiting for the new law to take effect* *the weather had an effect on everyone's mood*.
What is Grammarly saying that has you confused?
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#9  crich70 03-18-2020, 12:31 AM
To affect is to make a difference.
Effect = a change which is a result or consequence of an action or other cause.
So if you are doing something that changes something in some way you have an affect. If something in your life has been changed then whatever caused that change has had an effect.

So if I give you $50.00 when you need that sum to get a tire fixed I've had an affect on your being able to get the repair work done. On the other hand if you run over a nail in the road and suffer a flat tire then that nail has had an effect on your ability to get where you are going at the time.
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#10  rhadin 03-19-2020, 12:11 AM
Quote crich70
So if I give you $50.00 when you need that sum to get a tire fixed I've had an affect on your being able to get the repair work done.
Sorry, but no. "Affect" (which I bolded in the quote) should be "effect" as used in the sentence as written. For "affect" to be correct, the sentence should be something like:

"When I gave you $50, I affected your ability to . . ."
or
"Giving you $50 affected your ability to . . ."
or
"By giving you $50, I affected your ability to . . ."

For "affect" to work, you need something like:

"To affect your ability to . . ., I need to give you $50."
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