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The StoryGraph challenge GoodReads with quality recommendations, unfocus on ratings
#11  maddz 09-13-2020, 05:11 PM
Quote JSWolf
I did try LibraryThing. But when I reported a rather blatant error, it was ignored and not fixed. So I left for Goodreads. GR isn't perfect,but it is better then LT when a reported error gets ignored.At least on GR, I get a reply.
The problem is if the error is in someone's catalogue, all you can do is open a conversation with the member and hope they're still around to see the message (over the years there's been a lot of drive-by members). LT staff won't go into somebody's catalogue to fix things - it's the member's data, not the community's data.

I confess to being irritated by that as well, especially when it's a case of a RPG book where it's important to know which edition to combine the work into. With minimal information, and no cover, there's not a hope of knowing.
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#12  tomsem 09-13-2020, 09:12 PM
I need book recommendations about as much as I need to learn Klingon. GR has some of the worst book recommendations, but I do use reviews there to help filter books that I’m considering buying.

More broadly, I don’t think anyone does a good job with recommendations in general, and I pretty much ignore them.
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#13  issybird 09-14-2020, 09:16 AM
Quote Bookstooge
I'll take peoples' recommendations over some algorithm any day. But then, I actually WILL read the books I add to my tbr, unlike many people who add for adding's sake.
Books read and rated by my GR friends are by far the best source of recommendations, but my front page at GR is now so crowded with extraneous matter that I have to dig for them and I mostly don’t. I’m doing this for the giggles, but I’m not expecting much, but more power to them if they pull it off.

You’ve mentioned one of my GR pet peeves, though, and it’s all on the members. The ridiculous length of people’s TBR lists makes comparisons useless and it also means I don’t care to see their feed. I don’t get it, myself. What’s the point of a TBR with thousands and thousands of books? I’ve got one friend who’s over 70 with some 7,000 books on her want-to-read list.

I use GR for my own purposes and I try to limit the useful information I provide, i.e., I don’t link my Amazon account. It’s not as if they use my data to make reasonable recommendations; it’s all marketing.
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#14  Quoth 09-14-2020, 10:24 AM
I stopped adding books I read, wanted to read and reviews when I realised that Goodreads was an Amazon data capture tool. Amazon should never have been allowed to buy it, Mobipocket, IMDB, Book depository, Abe Books and others.

Also they are totally inflexible about content removal. As mentioned in the article, the site doesn't even work very well.

Like Amazon, they also conflate illustrators and colourists as book authors!

StoryGraph seems to be on a second incarnation and seems poor. Their selection screen for filtering recommendations is also poor, though the idea is reasonable and works well on the TV broadcast Guide, Digiguide, which is far better than Radio Times, RTE Guide, Sky Onscreen Guide / Search or Freeview/Freesat guide/search.

The best alternative would be for Amazon to be forced to divest of companies that they should never have been allowed to buy. But we certainly don't want to see Goodreads owned by any Social Media Company, Apple, Microsoft, Google or Oracle. Or any company owning online or physical bookshops.

I don't know what the answer is for an alternative. We do still of course list our new releases on Goodreads. But be warned, even if no copies are yet sold and the cover is changed before release, Goodreads will not remove the never used invalid cover.

Also Amazon refuses to remove listings for totally withdrawn novels. It's reasonable that they should keep listings for merely out-of-print novels.
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#15  Quoth 09-14-2020, 10:30 AM
Quote issybird
You’ve mentioned one of my GR pet peeves, though, and it’s all on the members. The ridiculous length of people’s TBR lists makes comparisons useless and it also means I don’t care to see their feed. I don’t get it, myself. What’s the point of a TBR with thousands and thousands of books? I’ve got one friend who’s over 70 with some 7,000 books on her want-to-read list.
There was a link on these forums to the number of books ordinary, avid and extreme readers can read before they die. If you actually have a life, it's a low number!

Yes, I'd like to see The StoryGraph succeed. However despite being a very keen reader I didn't sign up. I might later simply to make sure our books are on their database.
They could maybe import Neilsen's and ingram's ISBN datebases for the English language titles?
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#16  JSWolf 09-14-2020, 10:36 AM
Quote issybird
Books read and rated by my GR friends are by far the best source of recommendations, but my front page at GR is now so crowded with extraneous matter that I have to dig for them and I mostly don’t. I’m doing this for the giggles, but I’m not expecting much, but more power to them if they pull it off.

You’ve mentioned one of my GR pet peeves, though, and it’s all on the members. The ridiculous length of people’s TBR lists makes comparisons useless and it also means I don’t care to see their feed. I don’t get it, myself. What’s the point of a TBR with thousands and thousands of books? I’ve got one friend who’s over 70 with some 7,000 books on her want-to-read list.

I use GR for my own purposes and I try to limit the useful information I provide, i.e., I don’t link my Amazon account. It’s not as if they use my data to make reasonable recommendations; it’s all marketing.
My biggest peeve with GR is that they allow people to comment and rate books before they are released even if you've not read a review copy or ARC. So you get ratings that are useless and will be useless for some time. So fora new book, using GR to check how others who have read it liked it is worthless as those bogus ratings are still there. This could be somewhat fixed by making new books of a certain time have to have the line in the review that the person has read it.

"I have read this book" and if it turns out they then go on to give their blather (like they do before it's released), report it so the review/rating can be deleted.
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#17  ZodWallop 09-14-2020, 04:41 PM
Quote JSWolf
I did try LibraryThing. But when I reported a rather blatant error, it was ignored and not fixed. So I left for Goodreads.
I'm curious: what was the error?

I far prefer LibraryThing to GoodReads. I used to be a regular user there that I sort of drifted away from when I moved to ebooks.

Quote JSWolf
My biggest peeve with GR is that they allow people to comment and rate books before they are released even if you've not read a review copy or ARC.
I don't like reviews on GoodReads loaded up with GIFs. If I see a couple of those on a book, I assume the book likely isn't for me.
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#18  tomsem 09-14-2020, 05:44 PM
Quote ZodWallop

I don't like reviews on GoodReads loaded up with GIFs. If I see a couple of those on a book, I assume the book likely isn't for me.
I must be reading the wrong sort of books. I’ve never seen a GIF-laden review.

My main complaint about GR is that there have been very few improvements over the years. But I’m lazy, and am not prepared to abandon it and the associated integration with Kindle platform (accounting for 95% of my reading).
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#19  shalym 09-14-2020, 06:20 PM
Quote Quoth
<snip>

Also Amazon refuses to remove listings for totally withdrawn novels. It's reasonable that they should keep listings for merely out-of-print novels.
I'm not sure why you think they don't remove listings for withdrawn books--this is an example of a book that used to be available (I own it) but was taken down by the author:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004UI6UI4/
Here's another:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00N6W3CI6/

I'm sure that there are many more.

Shari
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#20  ZodWallop 09-14-2020, 06:37 PM
Quote tomsem
I must be reading the wrong sort of books. I’ve never seen a GIF-laden review.
You are reading the right sorts of books. I was going to link to one, but since I take those as a warning, I can't find a good example. There are a few on Twilight and Children of Blood and Bone though.

I may be a snob, but I think GoodReads attracts a dumber crowd than LibraryThing.
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