Mobileread
Libra Enlarge image
#1  Valkrider 02-18-2020, 03:34 AM
I have an epub with several images in the book content. The images are quite small and as they have text on them it is unreadable. Is there a way to enlarge the image so that it is readable?
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#2  JJ Johnson 02-18-2020, 04:19 AM
I just got a Libra today and read that converting epub to kepub allows images to be resized.

I installed the needed plugin into Calibre to do the conversion (Kobo TouchExtended), but haven't yet figured out how to do the conversion.
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#3  Quoth 02-18-2020, 08:31 AM
It's automatic with the default settings when you transfer a book.
I disabled the on-the-transfer kepub conversion in the settings as I prefer the more accurate page and font layout/rendering of epub.

I have edited the CSS in some really old ebooks so that images are 2/3rds of screen width.
Assuming an outer default centres the image and something outer has height: auto;
Code
.figscale { width: 1920 px; max-width: 67%
}
Then the HTML might be
Code
<div class="center"><img class="figscale" src="../images/00013.gif" alt="" title=""/>
Also in Calibre, select "tablet" as device in conversion settings to avoid image rescaling. Seems to work best with all my DOCX, mobi and AZW conversions to epub.
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#4  ps67 02-18-2020, 12:16 PM
I use epub when there no images or notes but when there are them I convert in Kepub because in that way I can use images enlargement and pop up notes.
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#5  Quoth 02-18-2020, 01:58 PM
It's a bit sad that at the beginning of mobi and epub that the there was no:
* popup notes. On most eReaders footnotes work badly.
* Rotten support for other than Roman-Latin, though it was solved already on UNIX, VMS, DOS in 1980s, never mind Windows & Linux and Mac in 1990s.
* Client side pure HTML image map (simple HTML, no java).
* Separate zoom on images and text

There is no reason why epub renderers can't do popup notes and zoom images like kepub, except most seem to be using Adobe (ADE?) and it's down the back of sofa income for them.
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#6  JJ Johnson 02-18-2020, 03:42 PM
Yes, I've since discovered that the plugin will automatically convert epub to kepub (shown as "Kobo epub" on the device).

One thing I'm having some trouble dealing with is font size, which appears different in every book I try. I adjust it in the settings, go to another book and it's often either very small or very large. I was hoping the reader would somehow save the reading settings for individual books. Then again, I'm new to the interface, so maybe I just don't know what I'm doing yet.
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#7  davidfor 02-18-2020, 08:55 PM
Quote JJ Johnson
Yes, I've since discovered that the plugin will automatically convert epub to kepub (shown as "Kobo epub" on the device).

One thing I'm having some trouble dealing with is font size, which appears different in every book I try. I adjust it in the settings, go to another book and it's often either very small or very large. I was hoping the reader would somehow save the reading settings for individual books. Then again, I'm new to the interface, so maybe I just don't know what I'm doing yet.
The device does store the font size for a book if you change it. When you change the setting, the font size you choose is saved for that book, and saved as the default for the next book. If you change the font size, close the book, open another and change the font size, when you return to the first book, it should use the font size you chose for it. This means that any book that you set the font for, will remember that font. But, any new book, or book that you didn't set the font for, will use the last font setting that you chose.

But, unfortunately, kepubs and epubs use a different font scaling. For any size chosen in an epub, the kepub will appear to be using a much smaller font size. If you are swapping between epubs and kepubs, it means you need to adjust the font size for each. I think there is a patch to fix it, but, I'm not sure.

Edit - I should have said:

It also could be that the font size is different for each book. There are a lot some badly constructed books out there that set the font size in strange ways. This can mean that each book will show text in different sizes when opened. Some are easy to fix, some not so easy. Sometimes it is a deliberate design, and sometimes it is the tool used to produce the ebook that causes it.
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#8  Sirtel 02-18-2020, 11:31 PM
Yes, there is a patch to make the kepub and epub font sizes match.

Of course, that doesn't fix bad formatting. Personally I fix the formatting myself in every book I buy, otherwise it would drive me mad. Different font sizes, huge line heights and indents, spaces between paragraphs, embedded body font (often not suitable for eink and barely legible), the list goes on... Much simpler to remove all those things in the beginning and enjoy your books in peace later than to gnash your teeth every time you open a new book. (Yes, I know many people are not particularly bothered by fluctuations in formatting, no matter how wild. But many others are and why force yourself to endure it when it's pretty easily fixed?)
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#9  DNSB 02-18-2020, 11:52 PM
Quote Sirtel
Yes, there is a patch to make the kepub and epub font sizes match.

Of course, that doesn't fix bad formatting. Personally I fix the formatting myself in every book I buy, otherwise it would drive me mad. Different font sizes, huge line heights and indents, spaces between paragraphs, embedded body font (often not suitable for eink and barely legible), the list goes on... Much simpler to remove all those things in the beginning and enjoy your books in peace later than to gnash your teeth every time you open a new book. (Yes, I know many people are not particularly bothered by fluctuations in formatting, no matter how wild. But many others are and why force yourself to endure it when it's pretty easily fixed?)
Don't you just love the ebooks where they specify Times New Roman as the first font in a font-family declaration?
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#10  JSWolf 02-25-2020, 11:07 AM
Quote DNSB
Don't you just love the ebooks where they specify Times New Roman as the first font in a font-family declaration?
Or just as bad is when fonts are specified because they are the fonts used in the pBook but are not embedded.

I've seen cases where the CSS has over 100 unused classes. Why do the publishers toss in every class they've ever created?
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