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First ereader: Nook?
#1  LCIII 09-20-2020, 09:36 PM
I posted several years ago about getting an e-reader, but didn't go through with it. I'm now digitizing as much as possible to downsize, so having most of my books on an e-reader sounds like the way forward.

I'm considering a Nook Glowlight. For my first e-reader, I like the idea of support being available at any B&N. Do their associates typically know Nooks well? Will they be reasonably helpful with side-loaded books? I'm in the US, but lived overseas and hope to eventually do that again. Any issues with Nooks if you're overseas?

I assume I'll be fine starting out with just the Nook and B&N's e-book store. Eventually, I'll start exploring other markets and side-loading. At that point, I envision all of my e-books being centrally stored on my PC hard drive. I'll learn to use Calibre to manage my library. The reasons I see for storing everything on my PC are: 1) I want some control over my library, free of any device-specific obstacles; and 2) if I decide to switch to another company's e-reader, I want to be able to smoothly transfer my library to the new device (I assume having central storage on my PC would facilitate that).

If the Nook isn't a good choice for me, I'll probably consider Kobo next.

Thanks!
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#2  Sirtel 09-20-2020, 11:49 PM
If you plan to remove the DRM from your books, don't buy from B&N. You may not be able to even download your B&N books to your PC, let alone deDRM them. Besides, they only sell ebooks in the US. So forget B&N if you're going to live elsewhere.

The Nook is OK for sideloading, but it's less customizable than Kobo or even Kindle. No installing your own fonts, for example. And don't count on store assistance with sideloading.
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#3  meeera 09-21-2020, 04:49 AM
Quote LCIII
If the Nook isn't a good choice for me, I'll probably consider Kobo next.

Thanks!
Unless the Nook has some killer feature for you, I'd personally recommend getting a Kobo and seeking your support here. I doubt whether B&N store support is going to be 10% the usefulness of that. (But hey, I could be wrong - does anyone have personal experience of great Nook support in-store?)
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#4  darryl 09-21-2020, 05:06 AM
Personally I wouldn't touch a Nook. Firstly, support for it has been sadly lacking from B&N for quite a while now. However, in fairness, there are some signs now that James Daunt places some importance on it which may result in improved support. Personally I wouldn't take the chance. Secondly is the unfriendly approach to DRM removal, though if you are not worried about removing DRM this won't matter. Which leads to the next point? Is B&N going to survive? If not, what guarantee is there that you could access your purchased books. Though Kobo or less likely another vendor may take over your account, this is far from guaranteed.

I've never owned a Nook but from what I have seen over the years they make good and attractive e-readers. But I don't think B&N's track record gives any confidence of their long or even medium term survival. Good luck to James Daunt, their British CEO, who I think has his work cut out for him.
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#5  rcentros 09-21-2020, 07:51 PM
Quote meeera
... (But hey, I could be wrong - does anyone have personal experience of great Nook support in-store?)
Do you mean do they sometimes have them plugged in and charging? (That's about the best you can hope for.) No, I'm afraid you're not going to ordinarily get good walk-in service with Nook (but the same goes for Kobo and Kindle). In-store service for eReaders is pretty much a thing of the past (in the U.S. anyhow). I don't know how difficult it is to exchange a reader with Barnes & Noble. I've never had to do that.
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#6  LCIII 09-22-2020, 12:20 AM
Thanks for your helpful replies. I'll go with a Kobo. Now I'm just trying to choose a size.
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#7  MustardOrMayo 09-24-2020, 12:39 AM
Quote LCIII
Thanks for your helpful replies. I'll go with a Kobo. Now I'm just trying to choose a size.
Yes! I really like Kobo for various advantages they offer over Kindle, and seemingly, Nook too! (I don't use Nook as I don't live in the US)

Would you like me to help you choose?
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#8  JSWolf 09-24-2020, 08:13 AM
Kobo will give you a much better reading experience and eBook management experience then nook. Plus, you can get excellent support for Kobo here on Mobileread. There are lots of people who are very good at giving help.

So if you do move, you'd still have access to MR and the support you can get. Also, if you do move and your local library has Overdrive, you would be able to borrow eBooks for free with a Kobo. That's something you won't be able to do with a Kindle outside of the US.
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#9  John F 09-24-2020, 08:40 AM
Quote LCIII
I posted several years ago about getting an e-reader, but didn't go through with it. I'm now digitizing as much as possible to downsize, so having most of my books on an e-reader sounds like the way forward.

...
Just to be sure, you're not talking about reading PDFs on an ereader?
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#10  LCIII 09-25-2020, 02:48 PM
Quote John F
Just to be sure, you're not talking about reading PDFs on an ereader?
I don't think I'd use a 6-7 inch ereader for PDFs. I see an ereader as an upgrade for the reading experience I have with Google Play book samples on my phone.

I came across an interesting consideration in favor of the Nook. A couple of reviewers pointed out that B&N is the lifeblood the physical bookstore industry in the US. By using a Nook, you'd be helping the physical bookstore industry stay afloat. I didn't used to think of B&N as the good guy, but they're an important part of the US market and are a counterbalance to Amazon. That doesn't mean I'd automatically buy a Nook, but it's a consideration.
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