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Amazon Publishing in talks to offer e-books to public libraries
#1  ZodWallop 12-21-2020, 10:27 PM
Credit where credit is due, I found this story via a headline from GoodEreader: Amazon working on new system to license ebooks to public libraries

But I found the Publisher's Weekly article better. On the upside, Amazon may make their Amazon Publishing titles available to libraries. On the downside, it will be via something called the SimplyE platform. But it's an opening anyway.
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#2  binaryhermit 12-22-2020, 12:35 AM
This isn't KDP books, right, it's the stuff they actually publish, right?
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#3  jhowell 12-22-2020, 02:33 AM
Quote binaryhermit
This isn't KDP books, right, it's the stuff they actually publish, right?
Yes. Also note this is not for the Kindle platform.

From the Publisher's Weekly article:

Quote
First and foremost, the discussion covers Amazon Publishing titles only (not titles from Amazon’s KDP program). The current talks also do not include Audible, Amazon's digital audio service, which does not make its exclusive content available to libraries. And while Amazon is heavily invested in a subscription model for books and reading (Audible, Kindle Unlimited) a subscription model for libraries has not been part of the talks. All titles under the potential deal would be licensed ePub editions managed by the DPLA and its partner libraries and made accessible to patrons via the SimplyE app (a free, open source library e-reader app developed by the New York Public Library)—meaning library users would not have to go through Amazon to access the titles.
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#4  rcentros 12-22-2020, 04:02 AM
Quote ZodWallop
Credit where credit is due, I found this story via a headline from GoodEreader: Amazon working on new system to license ebooks to public libraries
No E-Ink devices, just Android and iOS.

And what's this nonsense about 21 steps to borrow a book with Overdrive? Definitely not true when using a Kindle or Kobo (or even a Tolino or Pocketbook).
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#5  ZodWallop 12-22-2020, 12:25 PM
Quote rcentros
No E-Ink devices, just Android and iOS.

And what's this nonsense about 21 steps to borrow a book with Overdrive? Definitely not true when using a Kindle or Kobo (or even a Tolino or Pocketbook).
Yeah, what is happening right now isn't much. But at least it is a start for Amazon published books to start appearing. Once the gate is open, hopefully things will get better.

I don't check books out of the library. But I know Amazon Publishing not offering their books to libraries has been a source of criticism.
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#6  Quoth 12-22-2020, 04:06 PM
It's an attempt by Amazon to put a foot in the door.
The old IBM then later MS: Embrace Extend Extinguish

They'll want a client that only works with their titles and eventually a monopoly.
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#7  murraypaul 12-22-2020, 04:40 PM
Quote Quoth
It's an attempt by Amazon to put a foot in the door.
The old IBM then later MS: Embrace Extend Extinguish

They'll want a client that only works with their titles and eventually a monopoly.
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All titles under the potential deal would be licensed ePub editions managed by the DPLA and its partner libraries and made accessible to patrons via the SimplyE app (a free, open source library e-reader app developed by the New York Public Library)¬ómeaning library users would not have to go through Amazon to access the titles.
The complete opposite of what you just said.

If they wanted something that just worked on their clients they could operate their own lending model. Oh wait, they already do.
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#8  fjtorres 12-23-2020, 06:54 AM
Quote binaryhermit
This isn't KDP books, right, it's the stuff they actually publish, right?
Correct.
AmazonPublishing sees commercial advantage in geting the books it publishes extra visibility on libraries whereas Amazon LLC, *retailer* of books sees no profit in getting the book *others* publish into library. In fact, they don'thave the right to negotiate that unless and until thdy modify their contracts.

Different creatures in the same zoo, each with its own interests and agenda.
APub in Grand Rapids is a different beast from KDP in Seattle; same owner, different business.

And it makes sense they would go with a non-Kindle solution because their books are already on the PRIME READS and KU libraries. This is just to get the books before non-Kindle audiences. Which means it will innevitably be a smaller effort since there are a lot less of those.
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#9  ApK 12-30-2020, 10:04 AM
Quote rcentros
And what's this nonsense about 21 steps to borrow a book with Overdrive?
Not nonsense. You start with 1. Sit at desk, 2. Turn on device....
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