Mobileread
Color JetBook Color 2 Review
#11  joblack 03-19-2013, 10:38 AM
0xf 0xf 0xf would probably be black? #0f0f0f would most probably be 0x1 0x1 0x1 (round up).

If you have picture with more colors (like 24 or 32 bit pixels) the software has to round every pixel color to one of the 4096 colors. So it can be that colors which are quite different in a 24 bit picture will be the same on a 4096 color screen.

I have tried colorful pictures with my JetBook Color 1 and they looked great. Of course you have to compromise in comparison to a 24 bit screen. Maybe I'll find a good test picture with just 4096 colors. I don't think the JBC2 screen will be in worse quality than the JBC1 one.

Btw. is the display non-glare? I do have to ask for the 4th time. ^^
Reply 

#12  Nate the great 03-19-2013, 01:39 PM
Quote rkomar
I'm not sure I understand. There are only 16 values per component, so you would likely only be able to set each RGB component to 0x00, 0x10, 0x20, ... ,0xf0, or perhaps 0x00, 0x11, 0x22, ... , 0xff. Not being able to set it to 0x0f isn't making the claim false. You'd only expect to be able to do that if 256 values per component were technically possible. Or did you mean something else?
Sorry, I was thinking of white (#FFFFFF) and got the sixteen (16==F) mixed up. You're right that #f0f0f0 or #ffffff would probably be more correct.

But it still cannot show that color.

Quote joblack

Btw. is the display non-glare?
The JBC2 screen is pretty shiny.
Reply 

#13  rkomar 03-19-2013, 02:58 PM
Quote Nate the great
Sorry, I was thinking of white (#FFFFFF) and got the sixteen (16==F) mixed up. You're right that #f0f0f0 or #ffffff would probably be more correct.

But it still cannot show that color.
Okay, but this is true of every kind of display out there. None can show pure white, nor pure black, nor some theoretical distribution of colours over the RGB space. They all show something different given the same RGB value (even among identical models). So, I don't think it's fair to single out colour E-Ink for a "claim" that I think exists only in your mind. If it shows a different colour for each of the 4096 RGB combinations, then I'd say it's living up to it's claim of displaying 4096 colours. I do think it's fair to say that the contrast and colour saturation are poor compared to other kinds of displays. No need to bring claims into it at all.
Reply 

#14  John F 03-22-2013, 11:59 AM
Quote joblack
0xf 0xf 0xf would probably be black? #0f0f0f would most probably be 0x1 0x1 0x1 (round up).

...
I take it you mean 0x10 0x10 0x10?
Reply 

#15  rkomar 03-22-2013, 04:38 PM
It's confusing because most software takes the standard 8-bit form (0xHH) for the RGB components. That gets translated internally to whatever the hardware can handle. In this case, with 16 colours, the least significant 4 bits are probably just truncated (or something similar). So, setting a component to 0x10 is effectively setting it to 0x1 of the 0x10 hardware possibilities. I suspect that 0xf was just meant to signify white in the original post.
Reply 

#16  joblack 03-22-2013, 04:58 PM
Quote John F
I take it you mean 0x10 0x10 0x10?
No there is no 0x10 for the JetBook Color 2 (every color pixel has a number from 0-15 (0-0xf) for every color (red, green and blue - 16 x 16 x 16 = 4096 colors).

0xf (so 15 from a palette from (0-255)) would be round up to 0x1 (=1 from a palette (0-15) for every color for the Jetbook Color display).

But that's just speculation, maybe the JBC2 is just trunking (and not rounding) the numbers (e.g. 0x0 - 0xf would still be 0 for every color).
Reply 

#17  John F 03-23-2013, 08:08 AM
Thanks for the explanation.
Reply 

#18  joblack 03-24-2013, 03:29 PM
I'll buy a JetBook Color 2 and then I can post a color comparison.
Reply 

#19  X read X 03-25-2013, 11:05 AM
I think whats forgotten here is the fact that eInk is in its infancy compared to other screen types.

Its unfortunate, however most people compare it to LED and LCD displays because it is often used in similar devices.

I think the point is that eInk is improving, slowly but surely. To me their is an obvious difference in the color. I've only seen picture comparisons which most likely means the real life comparison is more drastic.
Reply 

#20  joblack 03-25-2013, 04:24 PM
Quote X read X
I think whats forgotten here is the fact that eInk is in its infancy compared to other screen types.

Its unfortunate, however most people compare it to LED and LCD displays because it is often used in similar devices.

I think the point is that eInk is improving, slowly but surely. To me their is an obvious difference in the color. I've only seen picture comparisons which most likely means the real life comparison is more drastic.
The problem is that some people think it has to be fast to be useful. Nobody complains that paper pictures aren't moving fast (except Harry Potter perhaps).

I think e-ink is fine. I don't like this artificial white (like in the Kindle PW sidelight) and I don't care if there is some weak grey instead of 'real white'.
Reply 

 « First  « Prev Next »  Last »  (2/7)
Today's Posts | Search this Thread | Login | Register