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New Leaf Nominations for June 2019 • Into the Labyrinth: The Quest
#21  Dazrin 05-01-2019, 04:44 PM
Quote issybird
It's awfully tempting to nominate this:

The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code
Oooh! That sounds very interesting. My library even has a copy. I can already see this will be a bad month for my TBR list.

Quote Victoria
I thought about Lost Horizon and Shangri-La too. Something about that legend is so alluring and really captures the imagination.
Lost Horizon is one of many books that I discovered through the book club even though it was never a selection. (Runner up in March 2015 my notes say.)
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#22  Catlady 05-01-2019, 05:05 PM
Quote Victoria
A quest for justice - such an excellent interpretation of the theme! And it fits it literally as well. I heard stories about this growing up, because a friend of our family was a POW in that camp. He had tuberculosis and was in an isolation unit, so didn’t participate at all. However apparently a Acadian man from the village next to ours was there as well, and was involved in helping to plan. He was later invited to see the premiere of the movie, when it came out.
The last of the Great Escapers, Dick Churchill, died earlier this year: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-devon-47257570

He was one of the men recaptured but was not executed because the Nazis apparently thought he might be related to Winston Churchill: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-two/10716508/Last-British-Great-Escaper-tells-how-he-escaped-execution.html

I've always loved the movie version, which led me to Paul Brickhill's book long ago. A few years back I read Tim Carroll's book The Great Escape from Stalag Luft III, which adds to the story and does include some information about the Gestapo killers and how they were hunted down.
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#23  issybird 05-01-2019, 05:14 PM
Quote Victoria
I think it sounds fascinating. I’m excited to follow up, even if you don’t nominate it. Thanks.
(Edit - just wanted to pass on that a number of reviewers found it difficult to see the symbols / text on the kindle version)
Quote Dazrin
Oooh! That sounds very interesting. My library even has a copy. I can already see this will be a bad month for my TBR list.
Given the support, I'm going to nominate The Riddle of the Labyrinth, but I won't get it up until tomorrow. Maybe the Minotaur will get a mention at that!
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#24  issybird 05-01-2019, 05:17 PM
Quote Catlady
I've always loved the movie version, which led me to Paul Brickhill's book long ago. A few years back I read Tim Carroll's book The Great Escape from Stalag Luft III, which adds to the story and does include some information about the Gestapo killers and how they were hunted down.
Also worth reading is The Wooden Horse by Eric Williams, about another noteworthy escape from Stalag Luft III.
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#25  Victoria 05-01-2019, 06:29 PM
Quote Catlady
The last of the Great Escapers, Dick Churchill, died earlier this year: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-devon-47257570

He was one of the men recaptured but was not executed because the Nazis apparently thought he might be related to Winston Churchill: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-two/10716508/Last-British-Great-Escaper-tells-how-he-escaped-execution.html

I've always loved the movie version, which led me to Paul Brickhill's book long ago. A few years back I read Tim Carroll's book The Great Escape from Stalag Luft III, which adds to the story and does include some information about the Gestapo killers and how they were hunted down.
Thanks for the great links Catlady! It’s quite humbling to read what these men, and that whole generation, endured through WW II. Your links led to more links - so many remarkable stories!
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#26  Victoria 05-01-2019, 07:14 PM
Quote Victoria
A quest for justice - such an excellent interpretation of the theme! And it fits it literally as well. I heard stories about this growing up, because a friend of our family was a POW in that camp. He had tuberculosis and was in an isolation unit, so didn’t participate at all. However apparently a Acadian man from the village next to ours was there as well, and was involved in helping to plan. He was later invited to see the premiere of the movie, when it came out.
Correction: I mentioned a family friend who was a prisoner in the POW camp had TB. However, this recent article only refers to an injury, so I was mistaken. I realize the chances of anyone seeing my earlier post and recognizing T. Hatfield are slim to none. However, I felt I should correct the record.

https://www.thevanguard.ca/community/emotional-journey-for-yarmouth-resident-tracy-hatfield-as-he-retraces-familys-history-with-overseas-visit-to-cemeteries-and-former-pow-camp-257317/
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#27  Ralph Sir Edward 05-01-2019, 07:20 PM
Silverlock, by John Myers Myers.

A book that starts with "If I had wanted to live, I would have died. . . "

With enough references to write a concordance as long as the book, without ever being pedantic or stuffy.
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#28  CRussel 05-01-2019, 08:33 PM
Quote issybird
Given the support, I'm going to nominate The Riddle of the Labyrinth, but I won't get it up until tomorrow. Maybe the Minotaur will get a mention at that!
Seconded. And already added to my TBR.

Charlie.
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#29  gmw 05-01-2019, 11:41 PM
The previous discussion and nominations have realigned my sights a little...

I nominate Duncton Wood by William Horwood.

Quote
Enter the magical, colourful, poignant world of Bracken and Rebecca, Mandrake the tyrant, Boswell the scribe, Hulver, Comfrey... and all the other moles of Duncton Wood. Set deep in the English countryside, this enchanting story tells of an ancient community losing its soul - but saved by courage and love.
730 pages (in paperback)

Here are some example links/prices:
Amazon US - USD$2.51 | Amazon UK - £1.99 | Amazon CA - CDN$2.99 | Amazon AU - AUD$3.69 | Kobo US - USD$2.99 | Kobo UK - £1.99 | Kobo CA - CAD$2.99 | Kobo AU AUD$4.99 | Kobo NZ NZD$4.99

Also see Goodreads.


It's a little like Watership Down by Richard Adams, including the fact that it can be quite violent. And it's a little like the Narnia books by C.S. Lewis, in that religion is quite clearly part of this story. But it's also very much its own story. When I last read it 10 years ago I enjoyed it very much, although perhaps not with the full enthusiasm of my youth.

Do not be concerned that it looks like the start of a series; this first book was not written with any intention of a series. It was only 8 years later that Horwood decided to cash in on this book's success. (That's a bit cynical sounding, the next 5 books are quite good, although with rather more extreme violence.) The story definitely covers both the "Labyrinth" and "Quest" elements of our theme.

Having been a very popular book in its day I suppose many of you may have read it already ... not that it matters.


At the risk of putting down my own nomination, I will say that Dunction Wood is Horwood's first book, but not his best. That honour, IMO, goes to either The Stonor Eagles or Skallagrigg - these both got a 5/5 from me. (I have not yet tried his more recent Hyddenworld fantasy series.)
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#30  gmw 05-01-2019, 11:42 PM
Quote issybird
Given the support, I'm going to nominate The Riddle of the Labyrinth, but I won't get it up until tomorrow. Maybe the Minotaur will get a mention at that!
Minotaur or not , I third this. It sounds very interesting to me.
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