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New Leaf Nominations for May 2019 • You're Never Too Young: Children
#11  gmw 04-02-2019, 08:45 AM
Quote drofgnal
I browsed this list from goodreads. 122 adult novels with a child protagonist:

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/13167.Adult_Fiction_With_Child_Protagonist

My favorite on the list is 'All the Light We Cannot See'.

I'm still mulling over the list for a nomination. Funny, I don't see any classics in that list like David Copperfield.
I thought it was interesting to see the list, I had not considered books that were specifically adult stories.

One author and book on that list attracted my particular attention: Beasts of No Nation by Uzodinma Iweala. That would present a rather macabre interpretation of our theme (never too young ... to be a soldier).

I suspect you don't see David Copperfield because it is generally considered a children's, or a teenage level, story.
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#12  issybird 04-02-2019, 11:42 AM
I'm going to follow through with my second idea and nominate The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley. Even those who haven't read it will know its famous opening line, "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there." People may also have seen the film with Julie Christie and Alan Bates; there was also a 2015 BBC production.

I'm going to borrow bits from Goodreads and Wikipedia, as I think both are a little too revealing.

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Summering with a fellow schoolboy on a great English estate, Leo, the hero of L. P. Hartley's finest novel, encounters a world of unimagined luxury. . . . The Go-Between is a masterpiece—a richly layered, spellbinding story about past and present, naiveté and knowledge, and the mysteries of the human heart.
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The book gives a critical view of society at the end of the Victorian era through the eyes of a naïve schoolboy outsider.

In the book’s prologue, Leo Colston chances upon a diary from 1900, the year of his thirteenth birthday, and gradually pieces together a memory that he has suppressed. Under its influence, and from the viewpoint of what he has become by the midpoint of “this hideous century”, Leo relives the events of what had once seemed to him its hopeful beginning.
The price is slightly outside our US parameter, but cheaper in the UK and Canada and available on OverDrive and Audible. I also figure it's readily available in print for those who don't mind that.

Amazon US $10.99 | Amazon UK £4.99 | Amazon CA $10.99 | Amazon AU $14.99

344 pp.
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#13  issybird 04-02-2019, 11:52 AM
Quote gmw
The book is rather more serious and sophisticated in tone and writing than the blurb above may indicate. I found it an excellent story that just happens to be targeted at children ("ideal for readers 11+"). It is certainly less tongue-in-cheek than the (also excellent) Artemis Fowl stories. I was really tempted to nominate Artemis Fowl, as it feels more childish in nature and so perhaps more in keeping with the theme, but I do think Airman is the better book. Colfer has also written a few books for adults (Plugged and Screwed) that are also very good reads.
I read the first three Artemis Fowl books with great enjoyment; then my reading companion aged out of them. I considered going back to them, but the first three wrapped things up and my experience has been that a series starts to tale off after the initial flurry, which of course might not be fair in this case. All this a long-winded way of saying that I'm taking seriously your comment that Airman is a better book than Artemis Fowl, as I know I've enjoyed the author!
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#14  bfisher 04-02-2019, 01:59 PM
I second The Go-Between.
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#15  CRussel 04-02-2019, 03:13 PM
I'd like to nominate a Canadian classic, the ever popular Anne of Green Gables. Especially (hides his head in shame) because I've never actually read it!

Amazon description:
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Eleven-year-old orphan Anne Shirley has just arrived at Green Gables, and already her guardians want to send her back. First, she’s not the boy the Cuthberts expected. Second, she talks too much. And even with her generous spirit, the redhead’s a trouble magnet. She gets the neighbor drunk and nearly poisons the pastor!

Still, despite a rocky start, the fiery Anne wins over her guardians and her new community. She enjoys life at Green Gables, excels in school, and earns a coveted scholarship. But when tragedy hits, Anne must choose between her dreams and the only home she’s ever known.

In this beloved coming-of-age story, Lucy Maud Montgomery drew from her own experiences growing up in Canada during the nineteenth century to introduce generations of readers to one of literature’s most original and inspiring characters.
The book is short, under 200 pages, and public domain virtually everywhere. There are audio versions available, multiple film versions (even a 1919 silent film), television movies, and television series.


Amazon -- $0.00

FadedPage -- Public Domain in Life+50 and Life+75 countries

Audible -- many editions. Pick your favourite.
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#16  Catlady 04-02-2019, 03:15 PM
Decisions, decisions. I have four contenders (so far!), and can't make up my mind.
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#17  Victoria 04-02-2019, 05:03 PM
I’m still vicillating as well, but definitely seconding Anne of Green Gables. I adored it as a kid - but when I reread it as an adult I found it quite funny.
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#18  Victoria 04-02-2019, 05:13 PM
Quote drofgnal
I browsed this list from goodreads. 122 adult novels with a child protagonist:

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/13167.Adult_Fiction_With_Child_Protagonist

My favorite on the list is 'All the Light We Cannot See'.

I'm still mulling over the list for a nomination. Funny, I don't see any classics in that list like David Copperfield.
Thanks drofgnal, great list -it’s a keeper. ‘The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie’ is one of 2 I’m still considering. I haven’t read it, but it did create a bit of a stir in Canada when it came out.
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#19  Bookpossum 04-02-2019, 05:32 PM
I third The Go-Between.
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#20  Catlady 04-02-2019, 06:24 PM
I'm nominating One Night in Winter (2014) by Simon Sebag Montefiore.

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Inspired by a true story, prize-winning historian and acclaimed novelist Simon Sebag Montefiore explores the consequences of forbidden love in this heartbreaking epic of marriage, childhood, danger, and betrayal that unfolds in Stalin's Moscow during the bleak days after World War II.

As Moscow celebrates the motherland's glorious victory over the Nazis, shots ring out on the crowded streets. On a nearby bridge, a teenage boy and girl—dressed in traditional nineteenth-century costumes—lie dead. But this is no ordinary tragedy, because these are no ordinary teenagers. As the son and daughter of high-ranking Soviet officials, they attend the most elite school in Moscow. Was it an accident, or murder? Is it a conspiracy against Stalin, or one of his own terrifying intrigues?

On Stalin's instructions, a ruthless investigation begins into what becomes known as the Children's Case. Youth across the city are arrested and forced to testify against their friends and their parents. As families are ripped apart, all kinds of secrets come spilling out. Trapped at the center of this witch-hunt are two pairs of illicit lovers, who learn that matters of the heart exact a terrible price. By turns a darkly sophisticated political thriller, a rich historical saga, and a deeply human love story, Montefiore's masterful novel powerfully portrays the terror and drama of Stalin's Russia.
Amazon US, $8.49

Kobo US, $8.49
Kobo Canada, $10.99 CAD
Kobo Australia, $12.99 AUD
Kobo New Zealand, $18.39 NZD
Kobo UK, £5.49

Audiobook available. E-book and audiobook can be borrowed through Overdrive, Hoopla, and Scribd.
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