Mobileread
Kindle vs Nook US market share
#11  Fbone 02-25-2011, 05:55 AM
Ebook sales percentage as listed totals 101%. This leaves nothing for Sony, Kobo, and everyone else. I would think they would have more than 1% market share. Unless their Borders number includes Kobo.
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#12  fjtorres 02-25-2011, 08:20 AM
Quote Fbone
Ebook sales percentage as listed totals 101%. This leaves nothing for Sony, Kobo, and everyone else. I would think they would have more than 1% market share. Unless their Borders number includes Kobo.
I noticed that. It's likely a matter of blindly rounding everything up.
With those numbers you could easily subtract 1 from each listed percentage (rounding everything down instead) and have a reasonable number for Sony & "others" combined.
As for Borders, remember, their online store *is* Kobo.

For 2011, "others" should see a big jump if Google Books' local-branding effort pans out.

Another point to consider for 2011 is how long Sony is going to stay in the eink reader business with what is clearly a low single-digit share of the market, both in hardware (4%?) and in content. Unlike Amazon, B&N and even Kobo--who were recently touting an installed base of over a million worldwide--Sony has been as mute about their reader sales as their stalled PS3 console sales. And on the PS3 side they at least have software sales to pin their hopes on. Since Sony engineers its own readers--unlike Kobo and other second-tier players--their costs are higher and without higher volume sales to defray the costs the readers are not going to be delivering much in the way of profit or even revenue. They aren't even "buying" market share with their efforts.

With Apple shutting them out of the iOS market their best bet would seem be to switch their focus to Android tablets. (Their mobile gaming is already moving to android, so this is actually *likely* especially in view of the success of NookColor.)

Of course, Sony decision making is often driven more by hubris and company image building instead of P&L or Market Share strategies so they may keep on plugging away, hoping for a miracle, just as they're still plugging away in mp3 players, living off brand loyalty. Still, they did abandon the category once already in their home market so...

Interesing times coming.
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#13  Lemurion 02-25-2011, 10:29 AM
The more I look at it, the more I see Sony moving out of this market. It's a pity because they make very high-quality devices, but I just don't see them holding on with their market share.
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#14  leebase 02-25-2011, 10:48 AM
Quote fjtorres
5- Apple sold 9% of the ebooks. So much for the 20% brag. Explains the need to get competing reader apps out of iOS.
Or, if one pays attention, you'll realize that Apple said "of those publishers" who's books sold on the iBookStore, the iBookStore was getting 20% of their business.

And that was a number released shortly after the iPad was introduced. Who knows what those numbers are now (for books available via the iBookStore).

9% of the market in 9 months of existence -- I'd say that isn't so bad.

Of course, the iPad is muddled as folks can buy books from Amazon and B&N on their iPad. So the iBookstore getting 9% of the ebook business doesn't tell the whole "iPad as a reader" story.

Lee
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#15  boswd 02-25-2011, 11:00 AM
Quote fjtorres
I noticed that. It's likely a matter of blindly rounding everything up.
With those numbers you could easily subtract 1 from each listed percentage (rounding everything down instead) and have a reasonable number for Sony & "others" combined.
As for Borders, remember, their online store *is* Kobo.

For 2011, "others" should see a big jump if Google Books' local-branding effort pans out.

Another point to consider for 2011 is how long Sony is going to stay in the eink reader business with what is clearly a low single-digit share of the market, both in hardware (4%?) and in content. Unlike Amazon, B&N and even Kobo--who were recently touting an installed base of over a million worldwide--Sony has been as mute about their reader sales as their stalled PS3 console sales. And on the PS3 side they at least have software sales to pin their hopes on. Since Sony engineers its own readers--unlike Kobo and other second-tier players--their costs are higher and without higher volume sales to defray the costs the readers are not going to be delivering much in the way of profit or even revenue. They aren't even "buying" market share with their efforts.

With Apple shutting them out of the iOS market their best bet would seem be to switch their focus to Android tablets. (Their mobile gaming is already moving to android, so this is actually *likely* especially in view of the success of NookColor.)

Of course, Sony decision making is often driven more by hubris and company image building instead of P&L or Market Share strategies so they may keep on plugging away, hoping for a miracle, just as they're still plugging away in mp3 players, living off brand loyalty. Still, they did abandon the category once already in their home market so...

Interesing times coming.

I can see Sony jumping into the LCD screen market. But they'll screw it up by charging something like $500 for it.

I don't know who's in charge of the North American Operation but lets look at their track record this past decade.

1. Leader in televisions and HDTV's - Market is now dominated by Vizio and Samsung

2. Created and was the leader in portable music players - Apple comes in and pushes them out the door with the iPod and iTunes

3. Was one of the first to head into the digital ereading market. Certainly the first major electronics company to jump on eink. - First the Kindle and now even the Nook have shoved them to the side.

If I was the CEO in Japan I would be like "What the bleepedy bleep is going on in North America?"
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#16  fjtorres 02-25-2011, 03:29 PM
Quote boswd
I can see Sony jumping into the LCD screen market. But they'll screw it up by charging something like $500 for it.

I don't know who's in charge of the North American Operation but lets look at their track record this past decade.
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If I was the CEO in Japan I would be like "What the bleepedy bleep is going on in North America?"
I wouldn't be so quick to blame the local Sony unit chiefs; it isn't clear they have enough autonomy to screw up much beyond their marketting.

I'm hardly a Sony fan (far from it, in fact) and I agree that Sony has pretty much screwed up everything they've launched in the last decade-plus but the core misteps all seem to have originated in Japan, mostly by their clear inability to read market trends and consumer needs.

Sony simply doesn't do integration well; not in the company structure, where individual units regularly undercut each other or ignore mandates from the Board, costing the company billions (it got Kutaragi fired but by then it was too late), and not in products. Ten years after iPod launched, Sony *still* doesn't have a handle on how to use online services and content to add value to hardware or vice-versa. Add-in that Sony doesn't seem to bother with market research or customer preference. (Three years after it became clear people buy Kindles because of Whispernet and the bookstore, Sony is still insisting touchscreens are a more compelling feature than either. Which it is. For 4 percent of the market. Maybe.)

Trying to guess which way those guys will go is a job even the Pythia at Delphi would refuse. They are just as likely to drop out of the market next week as they are to introduce a 3D grayscale ebook reader. They have a solid brand and rabidly loyal customers. But their management (whether in NA or Japan) is just totally out of it.

There's no telling if they'll even notice their product line is in trouble.
For all we know, they might actually be satisfied with a few thousand units a month in sales, as if they were a China-sourced online-only startup.
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#17  Lemurion 02-25-2011, 03:53 PM
I agree, Sony does have issues with integration; they seem to think everything exists in isolation. Having said that, they do make nice hardware.
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#18  jbcohen 02-25-2011, 04:01 PM
To what do you attribute the dominance of the Kindle?

Certainly there is somewhat of an image thing that is promoting kindles - go out to the park with your Nook or Nook Color and see what reaction you get from others "Is that a Kindle?" you will be asked. "No its a nook" you will get some strange looks.
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#19  SCION 02-25-2011, 04:14 PM
My NOOKcolor has always been mistaken for an iPad. I stopped correcting people.
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#20  Lemurion 02-25-2011, 04:16 PM
Quote jbcohen
To what do you attribute the dominance of the Kindle?

Certainly there is somewhat of an image thing that is promoting kindles - go out to the park with your Nook or Nook Color and see what reaction you get from others "Is that a Kindle?" you will be asked. "No its a nook" you will get some strange looks.
Marketing: Amazon leveraged the fact that they were already the default online destination for book-buyers into a dominant position in eBook sales.

They took advantage of that status in conjunction with aggressive advertising and pricing to get themselves to the top of the heap. It's no surprise that they didn't open up the Kindle store to other devices until after they had gained dominance in the market.
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