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Tablets in Schools
#11  rcentros 06-18-2019, 12:22 AM
One of the big differences between an iPad (or any other tablet) and a Chromebook is that a Chromebook can easily be "locked down" and monitored so the kids won't be playing games on it when they're supposed to be doing their schoolwork. I'm guessing it could be done with iPads and/or Android tablets, but I don't think it has been done.

From the Chromebook's education page ...

Manage devices easily from the cloud

In the admin console, administrators have full control—enabling and disabling apps and software to all network devices.


Not only the above, but it can be easily used for multiple students (keeping costs down).

https://edu.google.com/products/chromebooks/?modal_active=none
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#12  ZodWallop 06-18-2019, 12:31 AM
Quote leebase
For my uses, the tablet/finger apps just have not appeared on Windows anywhere close to the vibrant app ecosystem for an iPad such that I'm even tempted to replace an iPad with a Surface.

Frankly, the Android tablet app ecosystem isn't anywhere near the iPad either...
Of course none of that has anything to do with tablets in schools, which I thought was the point of the thread.
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#13  leebase 06-18-2019, 08:09 AM
Quote ZodWallop
Of course none of that has anything to do with tablets in schools, which I thought was the point of the thread.
It does as lack of educational app ecosystem is a hold back for cheap tablets. And price is a hold back for the iPad and windows/Mac PC's. The surface is expensive, and not particularly durable. And on top of that, not a great tablet,
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#14  pwalker8 06-18-2019, 08:10 AM
Quote rcentros
One of the big differences between an iPad (or any other tablet) and a Chromebook is that a Chromebook can easily be "locked down" and monitored so the kids won't be playing games on it when they're supposed to be doing their schoolwork. I'm guessing it could be done with iPads and/or Android tablets, but I don't think it has been done.

From the Chromebook's education page ...

Manage devices easily from the cloud

In the admin console, administrators have full control—enabling and disabling apps and software to all network devices.


Not only the above, but it can be easily used for multiple students (keeping costs down).

https://edu.google.com/products/chromebooks/?modal_active=none
This is really the key. There have been efforts to lock down iPads, but kids seem to fairly quickly figure out ways around the restrictions.

As is usually the case, the biggest issue that one runs into is keeping the kids focused on what they are suppose to be doing rather than goofing off. I'm pretty sure there is no technical solution for that, but even with all the really cool learning apps for the iPad, most kids seem to view it as entertainment and games, not learning.
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#15  leebase 06-18-2019, 09:19 AM
Quote rcentros
One of the big differences between an iPad (or any other tablet) and a Chromebook is that a Chromebook can easily be "locked down" and monitored so the kids won't be playing games on it when they're supposed to be doing their schoolwork. I'm guessing it could be done with iPads and/or Android tablets, but I don't think it has been done.


https://edu.google.com/products/chromebooks/?modal_active=none
More evidence that it’s the software that’s holding tablets back. It’s not the price. It for sure isn’t the need for a reflective screen. Ergo...aiming a SCFEEN tech for schools is just nonsense.
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#16  Apache 06-18-2019, 09:34 AM
Quote pwalker8
This is really the key. There have been efforts to lock down iPads, but kids seem to fairly quickly figure out ways around the restrictions.

As is usually the case, the biggest issue that one runs into is keeping the kids focused on what they are suppose to be doing rather than goofing off. I'm pretty sure there is no technical solution for that, but even with all the really cool learning apps for the iPad, most kids seem to view it as entertainment and games, not learning.
The best way to teach kids is to make it fun and enjoyable. I used to own a Martial Arts School and taught a lot of kids. The worst mistake I have seen is treating the younger kids like adults. They do not learn the same way. As long as they were having fun it did not matter to them that they were learning and working out. A bored child will not learn.
When my son was in middle school, the School hired a teacher with great credentials from teaching men in the Air Force. He tried to teach the children using the same methods and could not figure out why his was the worst class in the school.
Keep the children interested and make it fun and they can do anything.
Apache
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#17  ZodWallop 06-18-2019, 12:34 PM
Quote leebase
It does as lack of educational app ecosystem is a hold back for cheap tablets. And price is a hold back for the iPad and windows/Mac PC's. The surface is expensive, and not particularly durable. And on top of that, not a great tablet,
I disagree with you on the quality of the Surface.

But I think you're making the mistake of confusing consumer commercial experience with tablets in schools. The two wouldn't be the same at all.

Nothing is stopping MS, Apple or Google from tuning their OSes to meet educational needs and developing platforms for them.

If the software developed for any of the OSes is good enough, than any would work well for schools.

Funny thing: We're quibbling on this when overall I agree with your main point: color eInk is not desperately needed for educational purposes. A tablet or laptop would be far more useful. Google's had a lot of success with their Chromebooks in schools.
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#18  leebase 06-18-2019, 02:34 PM
Yes, agree on eInk not being the answer. Also agree that the surface would be great in schools...better than a chromebook as it’s a full pc. But it’s pricey, not something a school system would buy for every student. And, I stand by the “not durable” for kids I’m school particularly when you consider the price.

That’s why Chromebooks so so well
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#19  rcentros 06-18-2019, 02:37 PM
Quote leebase
More evidence that it’s the software that’s holding tablets back. It’s not the price. It for sure isn’t the need for a reflective screen. Ergo...aiming a SCFEEN tech for schools is just nonsense.
Thing is, I think this is something that has to be built in from the "ground up." You really can't have an iPad or an Android tablet turn into something resembling a Chromebook. You would almost have to build a new, more limited device based on an iPad or Android tablet. And that would be a hard sell. I'm not a huge Google fan and I don't want a Chromebook, but they really can be used almost like an old-fashioned "dumb" terminal in the school environment. That gives them a huge advantage over a tablet for classrooms.
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#20  rcentros 06-18-2019, 02:42 PM
Quote leebase
Yes, agree on eInk not being the answer. Also agree that the surface would be great in schools...better than a chromebook as it’s a full pc. ...
Again, sometimes more isn't better. A "full PC" plays games, gets viruses and allows the kids to do things a Chromebook wouldn't. Actually a Chromebook, using Google Docs, is a pretty good fit for schools. I think that's the main reason they're doing well in the school market.
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