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Converting odt to ePub
#1  Jane Eyre 08-19-2019, 12:57 PM
Hi!
I've been trying to convert to epub an odt document (LibreOffice 6.1.3.2), but it gives me the following error.

How could I fix? Thanks!!
error.jpg 
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#2  DaleDe 08-19-2019, 01:29 PM
moved this thread to a more appropriate place.
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#3  patrik 08-19-2019, 01:36 PM
FWIW I gave up odt -> epub after I tried the docx-plugin for Sigil.

So, I just save from LibreOffice in docx, and open it with the plugin in Sigil. Works very nicely.
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#4  DaleDe 08-19-2019, 01:40 PM
I did try the ODT to ePub and I find the programmer made a lot of assumptions and does not follow the actual source well. I consistently get better results using Atlantis Word Processor to convert to ePub.

Dale
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#5  BetterRed 08-19-2019, 10:56 PM
@Jane Eyre - if you save it as DOCX you can either use Sigil's DOCXImport plugin which offers the possibility of mapping the Writer Styles to ePub CSS styles, or you can use calibre conversion (or editor) to convert DOCX to ePub, which will preserve your Writer styles the ePub's CSS, but it won't retain the style names, and it will flatten any hierarchical structure.

BR
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#6  Tex2002ans 08-20-2019, 08:24 PM
Quote Jane Eyre
I've been trying to convert to epub an odt document (LibreOffice 6.1.3.2), but it gives me the following error.
Since LibreOffice 6.0, you're able to convert directly to EPUB:

File > Export As > Export As EPUB

I would also recommend downloading the latest LibreOffice for feature/bug fixes (latest as of today is v6.3.0 or v6.2.6).

It still has quite a lot of kinks though, so you may want to try other methods as well.

Quote BetterRed
if you save it as DOCX you can either use Sigil's DOCXImport plugin which offers the possibility of mapping the Writer Styles to ePub CSS styles, or you can use calibre conversion (or editor) to convert DOCX to ePub, which will preserve your Writer styles the ePub's CSS, but it won't retain the style names, and it will flatten any hierarchical structure.
Yes, this works as well.

Calibre also takes ODT directly.
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#7  BetterRed 08-20-2019, 09:01 PM
Quote Tex2002ans
Calibre also takes ODT directly.
Calibre's DOCX conversion is usually yields better results. The DOCX Input module is actively maintained by Kovid - afaik the ODT input module is on life support. IMO the only reasons for using calibre's ODT conversions is because you're using an ancient version of Writer or political/religious/cultural bias.

BR
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#8  Doitsu 08-21-2019, 09:11 AM
Quote Tex2002ans
It still has quite a lot of kinks though, so you may want to try other methods as well.
IMHO, the LibreOffice epub filter isn't production-ready. I've re-tested the epub export filter with LibreOffice 6.3.0.4 and Kovid Goyal's demo.docx test file.

The filter still doesn't support lists in epub2/epub3 files and generates invalid epub2/epub3 books.

HTML files in Epub2 books still contain duplicate <title/> tags and stand-alone <br/> tags.

HTML files in Epub3 books still contain no <title></title> tags and style sheets contain direction: ltr; declarations, which are not allowed in epub3 books.

Also, the LibreOffice epub export filter generates CSS declarations with in and pt values.
[epub] demo_epub2.epub (186.3 KB, 53 views)
[epub] demo_epub3.epub (186.7 KB, 40 views)
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#9  Gregg Bell 10-28-2019, 07:48 PM
What's wrong with saving the .odt as an .html in LibreOffice and then opening the .html in Sigil, where it can be saved as an .epub?
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#10  DNSB 10-28-2019, 09:43 PM
Quote Gregg Bell
What's wrong with saving the .odt as an .html in LibreOffice and then opening the .html in Sigil, where it can be saved as an .epub?
For me, the docx export and then import to Sigil or calibre produces cleaner code (i.e. I have less cleanup and tweaking to do). LibreOffice's html export leaves too much cruft.
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