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What font are you using for what type of book?
#61  JSWolf 09-23-2020, 06:05 PM
I use ChareInk for the type of eBooks that have words.
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#62  fduniho 10-14-2020, 05:34 PM
In general, I favor Bookerly the most, and that's what I installed on my Kindle DX after jailbreaking it. But I keep a variety of different fonts on my Touch, Paperwhite 4, and Likebook Mars, and I use different fonts every now and then, though I don't strictly assign any to particular genres. One of my favorite fonts, particularly for novels in Moon+ Reader, is Lora. This is a good-looking transitional serif font with capitals and numerals that align well, thanks to generally fitting in a rectangular area that doesn't overlap with other characters or descend below the baseline. The tail of the Q might go down a little bit, but it doesn't go underneath other characters.

Amasis30, which came on my Nook, is a compact slab serif that resembles Bookerly. I have found it good for reading non-fiction on my Paperwhite. Malabar, which also came on my Nook, is one that I favored on my Kindle Touch, because it tended to be bolder and bigger than other fonts. But since my Paperwhite 4 lets me control levels of boldness, and Moon+ Reader gives me more fine-tuned control over font size, its advantages are not as important on these devices. When I try it out on my Likebook Mars, I usually go back to Lora. Literata looks good, but I usually favor Bookerly over it.

Moon+ Reader Pro comes with a font called Calluna, which is very nice, but I use it only with that app.

I sometimes use Tex Gyre Schola or FreeSerif for non-fiction. The former is based on Century Schoolbook, which was designed for school books, and the latter is my favorite Times New Roman alternative. I also recently used constan in Moon+ Reader for non-fiction. I also sometimes use EB Garamond.

When a book has a Publisher font, I usually use that if it is legible enough. If it's sans-serif, though, I usually find something to replace it. I rarely use sans-serif, but I have read some science fiction using the Ubuntu font.
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#63  Larla 10-15-2020, 10:30 AM
I know everybody hates this font but I love Comic Sans. I have it set as the main font in Windows and on my Android tablet and, of course, in Moon+ Reader where I read all of my e-books.
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#64  Uncle Robin 10-15-2020, 10:41 AM
Quote Larla
I know everybody hates this font but I love Comic Sans.
I don't hate it, in fact I've long wondered why so many do, and why they hate it with the sort of ferocious passion that should reserved for truly unconscionable moral aberrations, like decaffeinated coffee. Then again, I don't get the widespread fixation on ligatures either, so I'm clearly font blind. But at least you're not alone.
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#65  nashira 10-16-2020, 01:08 AM
Quote Uncle Robin
I don't hate it, in fact I've long wondered why so many do, and why they hate it with the sort of ferocious passion that should reserved for truly unconscionable moral aberrations, like decaffeinated coffee. Then again, I don't get the widespread fixation on ligatures either, so I'm clearly font blind. But at least you're not alone.
Generally people hate it because it shows up in the weirdest places. It is a decent font for those who are dyslexic, though, even if I think it's ugly so eh. Ugly is fine as long as its legible to the target demographic.
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#66  JSWolf 10-16-2020, 09:29 AM
Quote nashira
Generally people hate it because it shows up in the weirdest places. It is a decent font for those who are dyslexic, though, even if I think it's ugly so eh. Ugly is fine as long as its legible to the target demographic.
But one thing you can try for someone who is dyslexic is different colors. I know someone who finds green text on a black background helps in readability.
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#67  DNSB 10-16-2020, 12:01 PM
Quote nashira
Generally people hate it because it shows up in the weirdest places. It is a decent font for those who are dyslexic, though, even if I think it's ugly so eh. Ugly is fine as long as its legible to the target demographic.
Having looked at several items about Comic Sans a few months back, it appears that most of Comic Sans reputation as being good for dyslexics is an urban myth based mostly on recommendations by British Dyslexia Association. There is little support from any scientific studies.

One study to look at might be Good Fonts for Dyslexia. While Comic Sans is not mentioned, it does qualify as a san-serif font.

Looking at several other studies, it would appear that most of the "dyslexic" fonts show no real advantage for most dyslexic readers. All too often, the results came down to what font the reader is most comfortable reading with.
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#68  AccidentallyLazy 10-17-2020, 05:46 AM
Capita by Hoftype. It looks very much like Bookerly, however has improved (to me) ligatures for glyphs such as 'Th' 'ff' 'fl' 'fi' 'fj' etc.
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#69  trekk 10-19-2020, 02:39 PM
Quote AccidentallyLazy
Capita by Hoftype.
I use Bookerly most of the time. I'd prefer Capita over Bookerly, because the ligatures are indeed beautiful, but it's 43 EURO for each individual style, so Bookerly it is
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#70  CWatkinsNash 10-19-2020, 07:25 PM
I've been using Volkhov for everything since I downloaded it.
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