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New Leaf Nominations for January 2019 • Lost in Translation: Other Tongues
#61  Bookpossum 12-05-2018, 09:00 PM
This is probably something for the P&R group I suspect!
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#62  stuartjmz 12-05-2018, 09:25 PM
Quote Bookpossum
This is probably something for the P&R group I suspect!
Probably. Although language is never apolitical. For example, I was fascinated by Issybird's discovering that the book I nominated is only $3 at Kobo India. That discovery fits very nicely with comments made by its author in the introduction, wherein he spoke about the devaluation/erasure of Urdu in India. I think any thread about books in translation will inevitably involve some socio-political commentary for context
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#63  CRussel 12-06-2018, 12:57 AM
Well, I don't see anything jumping out at me, and my own nomination, Foreigner isn't getting any love, so I'll use my last ticket for The Left Hand of Darkness.
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#64  Dazrin 12-06-2018, 01:13 PM
With my last nomination, I will second Kitchen.
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#65  Bookworm_Girl 12-07-2018, 12:24 AM
Since I have two tickets left I will third Kitchen and also third The Man Who Watched the Trains Go By.
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#66  issybird 12-07-2018, 07:06 AM
The poll's up!
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#67  issybird 03-03-2019, 06:56 PM
Quote astrangerhere
Since this was my theme and I was definitely aiming for non-anglocentric authors, I will nominate Kitchen by the Japanese author Banana Yoshimoto.
I finally got to this based on your nomination here and have read the title novella (I'll read the shorter second novella in the volume tomorrow). It seems odd to say that a book about grief and despair is charming, but this is. I think it's the youthful voice and the sparse prose, but Yoshimoto doesn't pull her punches for all that.
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#68  astrangerhere 03-05-2019, 02:34 PM
Quote issybird
I finally got to this based on your nomination here and have read the title novella (I'll read the shorter second novella in the volume tomorrow). It seems odd to say that a book about grief and despair is charming, but this is. I think it's the youthful voice and the sparse prose, but Yoshimoto doesn't pull her punches for all that.
If you are unfamiliar with her, all of Yoshimoto's work deals with grief on some level. In every single book someone has died in some way. They are all exceptionally different, and all exceptional as works of Japanese literature. It is definitely my favorite style and it is always different from Western writing.
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#69  issybird 03-05-2019, 03:36 PM
Quote astrangerhere
If you are unfamiliar with her, all of Yoshimoto's work deals with grief on some level. In every single book someone has died in some way. They are all exceptionally different, and all exceptional as works of Japanese literature. It is definitely my favorite style and it is always different from Western writing.
Yoshimoto was entirely new to me. Which would you say is your favorite book of hers? It would be interesting to follow up Kitchen with a later work (I think Kitchen and the additional novella, Moonlight Shadow, were her first?)
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#70  astrangerhere 03-06-2019, 07:28 AM
Quote issybird
Yoshimoto was entirely new to me. Which would you say is your favorite book of hers? It would be interesting to follow up Kitchen with a later work (I think Kitchen and the additional novella, Moonlight Shadow, were her first?)
Kitchen, Hardboiled & Hard Luck, and The Lake are my five star ratings. The Lake is her most recent translated work, I believe.
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