Mobileread
Ebook Buying Addicts' Support Thread
#5391  LDB 10-24-2020, 04:27 PM
Quote issybird
Upthread, you mentioned having 4300 Kindle books, over 95% free. How can you navigate that without spending time curating it? One way or the other, it’s a time sink. If nothing else, you probably would benefit from being choosier up front and only acquiring books you really, truly see yourself reading in the next month or two. As it is, if you’re averaging reading 100 books a year, you’ve already got your next 43 years of reading, and that’s without “buying” any more books at all.

Eclutter is still clutter. You want to be able to see the trees and not just the forest.
Yeah, it's a lot but there's a decade or so worth in there I've already read so it's not as many years reading as it seems. As far as curating, I pretty much don't. I deliver a few dozen to my Kindle and work my way through them, removing them as I go along. When I get down to just a few I go to manage c/d and go through and deliver a few dozen more. Yeah, I guess I might spend a half hour or so going through and choosing and delivering them but then I'm set for months. And I should pass on more buying but I'm a sucker for military history and novels, especially WWII era, so I get all of those every time.
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#5392  pdurrant 10-24-2020, 05:24 PM
Quote DNSB
High reading speed and, probably, spending more time reading than most. I've also spent less time this year on re-reading though I've occasionally slipped like the week recently spent mostly on re-reading the Brother Cadfael series.

The last monthly Kobo Reading Life notice I received showed 137 hours reading and 88 books read.

Hmmm... If I took the time I spend on MobileRead and used it for reading instead...
Wow. A speedy reader who spends lots of time reading. I suspect I'm in the top 1% of readers, I think you must be in the top 0.01%!

Do you really need to be in this thread? I would have thought you have the opposite problem - finding enough new stuff to read!
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#5393  DNSB 10-24-2020, 08:22 PM
Quote pdurrant
Wow. A speedy reader who spends lots of time reading. I suspect I'm in the top 1% of readers, I think you must be in the top 0.01%!

Do you really need to be in this thread? I would have thought you have the opposite problem - finding enough new stuff to read!
I read the books so I don't have the issue of that ever increasing TBR many suffer from. OTOH, that does not really eliminate the issue of buying those books. I can afford the cost of the purchases but I suspect that classifying me as a ebook buying addict might be closer to the truth that I would prefer.
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#5394  pdurrant 10-25-2020, 07:23 AM
Quote DNSB
I can afford the cost of the purchases but I suspect that classifying me as a ebook buying addict might be closer to the truth that I would prefer.
Fair enough. I certainly wouldn't want to turn away anyone in need of help or understanding.

And it's certainly worth bearing our suggestions in mind when considering purchases. Especially when you have a high level of purchases, and in particular the 'bung it on a wish list until it goes on offer' suggestion.
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#5395  Tarana 10-25-2020, 01:06 PM
October has been a problem so far. A number of my favorite authors have had books discounted. Even though I pay far less by waiting for a special, they do add up.

For free books, I do agree that they take up time curating. All I can say is BE SELECTIVE, particularly when you have a lot of unread bought books. I go so far as to put freebies by authors I have not yet read into a separate FREE library. I read roughly 6 books out of it a year and use that Random button in Calibre to pick.
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#5396  astrangerhere 10-27-2020, 10:06 AM
My local indie bookstore was featured in the New York Times two weeks ago under the headline Your Local Bookstore Wants You To Know That It's Struggling. I don't know how my little college town indie bookstore, Flyleaf Books, made it into the Times, but I hope it helps them stay afloat.

I feel better and better about our decision to buy at least a few books from them every week, as we have been doing since March. Many of them are buying old favorites and replacing copies that are worn out. I have also started brainstorming books to buy for everyone on my Christmas list.

This is not about addiction, as I have otherwise not really bought any ebooks since the pandemic began. But that bookstore has been so important to me and my wife that we will do all we can to keep its doors open.
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#5397  Apache 10-27-2020, 10:16 AM
Quote astrangerhere
My local indie bookstore was featured in the New York Times two weeks ago under the headline Your Local Bookstore Wants You To Know That It's Struggling. I don't know how my little college town indie bookstore, Flyleaf Books, made it into the Times, but I hope it helps them stay afloat.

I feel better and better about our decision to buy at least a few books from them every week, as we have been doing since March. Many of them are buying old favorites and replacing copies that are worn out. I have also started brainstorming books to buy for everyone on my Christmas list.

This is not about addiction, as I have otherwise not really bought any ebooks since the pandemic began. But that bookstore has been so important to me and my wife that we will do all we can to keep its doors open.
Unfortunately there aren't any independent bookstores where I live. The last one went out of business in the mid '80s after Books A Million opened. I used to love going into bookstores to browse through the shelves. I still miss it although I have not been in an actual bookstore in years. The last time I was in BAM's and B&N's they looked more like toy stores.
Apache
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#5398  Tarana 10-28-2020, 09:57 PM
The only independent bookstore I frequented burned in the riots. Likely won't be back (and in a different city) until 2022. With both the bookstore and the yarn shop gone, there really isn't any reason for me to go to Minneapolis any longer. I can't read paper books any longer, but still went to Uncle Hugo's to occasionally get a book to send in to convert to ereader.
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#5399  astrangerhere 10-29-2020, 03:58 PM
Quote Apache
Unfortunately there aren't any independent bookstores where I live. The last one went out of business in the mid '80s after Books A Million opened. I used to love going into bookstores to browse through the shelves. I still miss it although I have not been in an actual bookstore in years. The last time I was in BAM's and B&N's they looked more like toy stores.
Apache
Quote Tarana
The only independent bookstore I frequented burned in the riots. Likely won't be back (and in a different city) until 2022. With both the bookstore and the yarn shop gone, there really isn't any reason for me to go to Minneapolis any longer. I can't read paper books any longer, but still went to Uncle Hugo's to occasionally get a book to send in to convert to ereader.
I am lucky that our store also has an ebooks arm, so I can purchase ebooks through them as well.
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#5400  CRussel 10-30-2020, 01:02 AM
Quote astrangerhere
I am lucky that our store also has an ebooks arm, so I can purchase ebooks through them as well.
This is something I'd like to see a lot more of, and I don't understand why Kobo or other non-Amazon platform hasn't tapped that market. I won't read a dead tree book any more -- just not comfortable with them (old man's eyes). But I'd be happy to support a local independent bookstore that would sell me an eBook of the DT book I'd been browsing in their store.
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