Mobileread
iPad Side load Kindle books to iPad using command line
#1  Terry Brown 02-17-2020, 07:09 PM
I know how to side load kindle books (kfx format is what I use) to the kindle app on an iPad. Currently, I use iMazing to do this primarily because iMazing connects to devices wirelessly.

But I would like to automate this a bit more. Is there a way to side load kindle books to the iPad kindle app using the macOS command line?
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#2  robarr 05-03-2020, 11:01 AM
Hi:

Maybe this one ?

Send eBooks to a Kindle from the MacOS command line

https://gist.github.com/nerab/1410840

Or this one

https://github.com/kparal/sendKindle

I have not tried it just googled “send to kindle command line”

Good luck
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#3  kyteflyer 05-05-2020, 05:01 PM
That sounds really complicated... unless you like using the command line, in which case ignore my next comment..

I use Send to Kindle on my Macs, it works well, and it also lets you sync between devices if you use that, rather than just sideloading.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/sendtokindle/mac
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#4  tomsem 05-05-2020, 08:44 PM
In macOS Catalina, it should mount in Finder and you can drag files over to files/Kindle. I’m not sure if it translates to some command line. Probably some AppleScript automation is possible for that.

You might ask in calibre forum how it connects and moves files over USB connection, supposedly it detects device and can copy stuff over to it, I’ve never used the feature, but I’m guessing it is equivalent of a command line thing. But they recommend calibre companion to do it wirelessly.

The other way is to use cloud storage for your files (ICloud, Dropbox whatever that you have on your Mac), and just open with the vendor’s app or Files (after connecting the cloud services (calibre companion integrates with Files)). To me this is ideal as you don’t need to connect the 2 devices physically.
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#5  Terry Brown 05-09-2020, 12:30 PM
I'll respond to everyone's comments here.

robarr: These scripts are other ways to use Amazon's Send To Kindle capability. Send To Kindle does not accept KFX format files.

kyteflyer: See above, Send To Kindle does not accept KFX format files.

thomsen: I am aware of the capability of using Finder to transfer the files. However, it requires the iPad be plugged into the Mac using USB. I have not found any means of automating this. You have to drag and drop files. Your second option of using cloud storage doesn't work with KFX files. If I attempt to open a KFX file stored in iCloud, for example, on my iPad, it does not properly load into the Kindle app.

My point with this thread is to see if anyone knows a method of automating the transfer of KFX files from my Mac to my iPad/iPhone.

Imazing is still the best I have found since at least it uses a wireless connection. However, I still can't find a way to script it--it requires using drag and drop. I may try doing this with Keyboard Maestro, which has that capability, although most advise against using it because mouse targets are inconsistent.

Ideally, I would have a command line script in macOS and I could access it via ssh from my iPad to initiate transfer of a file from the mac's file system.
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#6  kyteflyer 05-11-2020, 06:20 PM
Hrmmm. Is there a reason you want to keep the kfx format? Converting would make life easier. Then again if using the commandline is what you want to do, I dunno, seems like a messy way to do this particular thing, when you could use a combo of a couple of apps and get it done.

In short, never heard of a script to do what you want. It may be out there. Maybe you could post in Apple Discussions, where they are much more highly tech minded than we are.
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#7  Cootey 05-14-2020, 07:31 AM
Quote Terry Brown
I know how to side load kindle books (kfx format is what I use) to the kindle app on an iPad. Currently, I use iMazing to do this primarily because iMazing connects to devices wirelessly.



But I would like to automate this a bit more. Is there a way to side load kindle books to the iPad kindle app using the macOS command line?


It's not possible from the command line with a default iPad. Your problem with the iPad is that Apple has isolated the user and root directories from public access. You would need to jailbreak your iPad first, then find the path to the Kindle folder, then copy the files via terminal.



If you had a Kindle device, you would "cp *.kfx /Volumes/Kindle/documents". You'd need to manually mount the device on your desktop first, obviously. If you wanted to automate it, you could create a folder action that monitors /Volumes to execute a script that runs that command for you. You could even unmount the Kindle from the command line in the same script. I'm sure once you jailbreak your iPad, you can do a similar process.



I just jailbroke an old iPad last month and was poking around the root and user directories via terminal before selling it. I didn't have Kindle installed, so I can't tell you the specific paths as I can with a Kindle device, but once you have access to root, that will be an easy matter for you.
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#8  Terry Brown 05-27-2020, 01:26 PM
Thanks for the response. I am not interested in jailbreaking the iPad since I use it for many things and don't want the potential hassles.

The fact that iMazing is able to do this, even wirelessly, indicates to me that the iPad is not locked down completely since they copy files directly to standard iOS devices that are not jailbroken. However, iMazing does have the limitation that they prompt for the application that you want to receive the file you are copying--they have no way to know, without user interaction, if the ePub, for example is to be sent to iBooks or to Marvin. It is interesting to me that no one seems to know how this works--I have tried a number of forums with no results.

I have played with using Keyboard Maestro to automate the iMazing procedure, but automating the mouse movements required to drag and drop is flakey at best. Part of the reason I want to automate things a bit more is that I have to do the procedure twice, once for my iPad, once for my iPhone since I read on both devices.

I use kfx file format instead of mobi because I can build the kfx file from Calibre and get support for Kindle's page flip, which I love and is the one of the main reasons I choose to use the Kindle app for my reading. I consider page flip to be the only seriously creative feature for book reading apps I have seen in years.

Kindle also does a good job of supported highlights across columns and even pages, and I like the way I can export my notes and get a reasonably formatted output.
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#9  kyteflyer 06-03-2020, 12:37 AM
Quote Terry Brown
I use kfx file format instead of mobi because I can build the kfx file from Calibre and get support for Kindle's page flip, which I love and is the one of the main reasons I choose to use the Kindle app for my reading. I consider page flip to be the only seriously creative feature for book reading apps I have seen in years.

Kindle also does a good job of supported highlights across columns and even pages, and I like the way I can export my notes and get a reasonably formatted output.
Doesn't .azw and .azw3 do all that? I usually convert to that if I want to read on Kindle or one of the apps, because I like being able to sync between devices and I don't think mobi can do that.
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#10  ilovejedd 06-03-2020, 10:08 AM
Quote kyteflyer
Doesn't .azw and .azw3 do all that? I usually convert to that if I want to read on Kindle or one of the apps, because I like being able to sync between devices and I don't think mobi can do that.
As far as I know, if you use email to Kindle on Calibre, your ebooks actually get converted to mobi.

I don't think there's a way to send your own azw3 to Kindle without conversion aside from USB transfer.

It's been a while since I played around with formats but I do believe page flip is KFX only.
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