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July AUTHOR EARNINGS report brings focus on DRM
#41  Kumabjorn 07-19-2014, 09:14 PM
Obviously everyone has different standards and different experiences but if I should judge the publics Tech savvines as defined by friends and family who request Tech support for their phones, computers, tablets, and readers, then the verdict is in. They are all idiots. And I mean this in the friendliest way possible. There is no way these people know about DRM or how to do anything about it.
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#42  crossi 07-20-2014, 12:27 AM
Quote j.p.s
So, portability, ease of carrying multiple, possibly large books at once, ease of reading with one hand, no page flipping by the breeze ot the spine, search, font size adjustability, and built in illumination are all kind of pointless?
Not at all pointless. For heavy readers. The ones who need these things because they carry a book with them everywhere. For those who read maybe 5 book a year, I think that's the national average, and likely only read for a few minutes a few times a week most likely at home, the expense of an ereader seems unnecessary. For those people reading is simply not a high priority. It's appalling but a large number of people in the US don't read ANY books.
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#43  eschwartz 07-20-2014, 12:47 AM
Quote fjtorres
Me too.
However, I have a cousin who buys books, reads them, and flipps them to the local used book shop and a friend who would buy hardcovers, read them, and donate them to the local library. One reason he loves his kindle is he doesn't have to worry about flipping the books when he's done reading. Both are heavy readers that don't reread.

Takes all kinds.
Your friend could solve his problem by just throwing books away when he is done with them. It would come to the same thing, and be cheaper by the cost of an ereader.

Of course, there is still:
Quote j.p.s
[...] portability, ease of carrying multiple, possibly large books at once, ease of reading with one hand, no page flipping by the breeze ot the spine, search, font size adjustability, and built in illumination [...]
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#44  j.p.s 07-20-2014, 12:57 AM
Quote crossi
Not at all pointless. For heavy readers. The ones who need these things because they carry a book with them everywhere. For those who read maybe 5 book a year, I think that's the national average, and likely only read for a few minutes a few times a week most likely at home, the expense of an ereader seems unnecessary. For those people reading is simply not a high priority. It's appalling but a large number of people in the US don't read ANY books.
I only read a few books per year. It usually takes me over a month to read a book. I read 1 to 3 books a week from second grade through high school. That dropped to 1 to 3 books per month in college and grad school. After school, it dropped to less than a book a year, sometimes with years between finishing one book and startiing another. I went from almost always finiishing a book to almost never finishing a book. This went on for decades.

I tried reading on laptops. Didn;t work. Then in 2009 I bought a Kindle 2 and gradually started reading more. But I am still only up to a few books per year. But that is still hundreds percent above what I was doing for many years and has been going on for several years. It is all due to having a decent ereader. I only have a few minutes to read per day, and almost all of them are away from home. Even at home, reading on an e-reader works better for me.

Also, even though savings on e-books below street price is often tiny or negative, the occasional big savings can cover the cost of a reader pretty quickly.

I carry my books everywhere precisely because I don't have much time for reading and don't always know when that time will be.
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#45  Josieb1 07-20-2014, 04:28 AM
I have a kindle, and Kobo and a Nook. I buy my books from small independent publishers. I am lucky that as I read genre fiction I have loads of direct publishers to buy from, at my last count it was about 16. By choice I will not buy DRM books, only Amazon, Kobo and Nook use DRM in my world. I need every book I buy to be available on ePub and mobi. Most publishers give me both versions, for those that don't I use calibre to convert the version I buy (usually mobi) to the other version.

If I couldn't do that I wouldn't have multiple ereaders and I would buy a fraction of my books. I hate DRM with a passion, it's never good for the reader.
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#46  fjtorres 07-20-2014, 07:43 AM
Quote eschwartz
Your friend could solve his problem by just throwing books away when he is done with them. It would come to the same thing, and be cheaper by the cost of an ereader.

Of course, there is still:
Throw away (almost) new books?
Rather wasteful...

He used to buy, read, donate.
Stockpiling was not his thing.
Donating meant the library would either put them into circulation or sell them, but either way they'd get reread.

Both my (non-price sensitive) friend and my (price sensitive) cousin were getting their books back into circulation for others to read. I find no fault with either. Neither finds the cost of a reader an issue (and they come from very different worlds--my cousin, a suburban housewife with two kids and the friend, a single, mover-shaker who routinely dines with congressmen and governors in multiple states--yet both are very into SF&F.

As I said, it takes all kinds...
...yet all kinds find value in the same things, though not for the same reasons.

To a lot of prople a book is just a (hopefully) good read, not an object of veneration or special snowflake and neither labels nor provenance worry them overmuch.
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#47  BearMountainBooks 07-20-2014, 07:58 AM
Quote Josieb1
I have a kindle, and Kobo and a Nook. I buy my books from small independent publishers. I am lucky that as I read genre fiction I have loads of direct publishers to buy from, at my last count it was about 16. By choice I will not buy DRM books, only Amazon, Kobo and Nook use DRM in my world. I need every book I buy to be available on ePub and mobi. Most publishers give me both versions, for those that don't I use calibre to convert the version I buy (usually mobi) to the other version.

If I couldn't do that I wouldn't have multiple ereaders and I would buy a fraction of my books. I hate DRM with a passion, it's never good for the reader.
So, in that case, if you wanted to buy from an indie, would you buy direct from her website? Or even look there if you were concerned about DRM being on the other versions?

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#48  Josieb1 07-20-2014, 08:20 AM
Quote BearMountainBooks
So, in that case, if you wanted to buy from an indie, would you buy direct from her website? Or even look there if you were concerned about DRM being on the other versions?
Most of the books I buy come from individual publishers, such as Samhain, Loose ID, Dreamspinner Press, or from the genres version of Amazon, AllRomance. Any books self published tend to end up on AllRomance as well as Amazon, Smashwords etc so I don't buy direct from the authors web sites as that's not usually an option.

I avoid Amazon if the book is available anywhere else.
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#49  BearMountainBooks 07-20-2014, 08:34 AM
Quote Josieb1
Most of the books I buy come from individual publishers, such as Samhain, Loose ID, Dreamspinner Press, or from the genres version of Amazon, AllRomance. Any books self published tend to end up on AllRomance as well as Amazon, Smashwords etc so I don't buy direct from the authors web sites as that's not usually an option.

I avoid Amazon if the book is available anywhere else.
Rats. I've been thinking of pulling my books from AllRomance as they don't do particularly well there (mine are all one flames and that could be it. They do a good job offering advertising in a range of prices though.)

There's another venue I wanted to try, but being on both would be a bit more difficult to manage.

Thanks for the input. Appreciate it.
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#50  Josieb1 07-20-2014, 11:47 AM
Quote BearMountainBooks
Rats. I've been thinking of pulling my books from AllRomance as they don't do particularly well there (mine are all one flames and that could be it. They do a good job offering advertising in a range of prices though.)

There's another venue I wanted to try, but being on both would be a bit more difficult to manage.

Thanks for the input. Appreciate it.
I'm friends with quite a few authors and even though I avoid Amazon it's still their most important seller, and vital for self publishing. They get more money from direct publisher sales (I.e Dreamspinner, Samhain etc) per book but they shift more books via Amazon compared to any other seller.
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