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A sad library tale
#11  JSWolf 08-12-2019, 03:39 PM
Quote leebase
It was sad that I loved my local small town library....only to lose it when if my own parents had voted, we would have kept it
Did you ask them to vote for the library? If it was me, I would have asked them to vote in favor of the library.
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#12  Pizza_Cant_Read 09-03-2019, 12:45 PM
I think I posted about this over a year ago, but I miss my local library. It was in a storefront as well and was the only place I could access the internet. I would wait in line for the computer and read until it was my turn, then I would pop out my 3.5 inch floppy that had Mirc for IRC I would download programming tutorials, zines and whatever else interested me. There were two ladies there who were so kind to me and really made an impression on me.

I love libraries and everything they represent. I would not be the person I am today were it not for libraries. They were a bastion of free thought where I could read about anything I wanted without adult supervision or fear of judgement. A larger library in a nearby town would have 'Food Not Bombs' on the lawn, and I met a lot of interesting people who helped me break out of my small town mentality.

My library moved into a dedicated building some years ago and I haven't yet had a chance to visit.
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#13  Lsantiago7859 09-11-2019, 03:08 PM
Quote Pizza_Cant_Read
I think I posted about this over a year ago, but I miss my local library. It was in a storefront as well and was the only place I could access the internet. I would wait in line for the computer and read until it was my turn, then I would pop out my 3.5 inch floppy that had Mirc for IRC I would download programming tutorials, zines and whatever else interested me. There were two ladies there who were so kind to me and really made an impression on me.

I love libraries and everything they represent. I would not be the person I am today were it not for libraries. They were a bastion of free thought where I could read about anything I wanted without adult supervision or fear of judgement. A larger library in a nearby town would have 'Food Not Bombs' on the lawn, and I met a lot of interesting people who helped me break out of my small town mentality.

My library moved into a dedicated building some years ago and I haven't yet had a chance to visit.
We are related LOL! When my mom came to the mainland from Puerto Rico one of the first things she said was "go to the library with your sister!" To this day, that was the best thing she ever told me. I pay my taxes gladly knowing a portion goes to the public library. I read online so I can manipulate the font (age), but I still go now for the chance to learn about my community.
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#14  Tomk2 09-15-2019, 04:50 AM
My "local" library is scheduled to be closed next year. My town will still have several library branches, but the one just minutes from my house will be closed to the public. It seems that only the high school students used it, since it is actually attached to the high school. Imagine that. But all is well, I got my card minutes from my home before it "transitioned" into a school library, instead of 5 miles away for the nearest other branch (which also is attached to a high school? Hmmm.). Local branches might disappear, but the library will survive.

BTW- I don't think I ever saw my parents with a book, ever. But they were depression era children, food, housing, jobs, clothing, and supporting a family were way more important concerns for their generation than reading. But I always read about something as soon as I had an interest, way before I tried it or otherwise committed to doing it. Back then the saying was "books are knowledge," and it is true today. Google still doesn't tell you everything you need to know, but chances are books can give you everything you need but actual experience.
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#15  Fiat_Lux 09-19-2019, 02:56 PM
Quote ZodWallop
I never use libraries now and likely won't anytime soon. But I do think they are a public good and don't begrudge my tax dollars going to them.
I think it was Washington State that had a ballot measure to defund all public libraries, on the grounds that Amazon is available to everybody, and has all of the books one wishes to read.

I rarely go to the local library, but that is because it has neither the funding to purchase the books that I'm most interested in reading, nor the ability to do inter-library loans.
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#16  meeera 09-20-2019, 04:15 AM
Quote Fiat_Lux
I think it was Washington State that had a ballot measure to defund all public libraries, on the grounds that Amazon is available to everybody, and has all of the books one wishes to read.
There was a ballot measure? I know there was a terrible article on Forbes advocating this, but it was very thoroughly panned and they took it down.

https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2018/07/with-this-idiotic-essay-on-amazon-and-public-libra.html

There was this recent measure to fund Seattle libraries, which passed easily. I suppose you could squint and call it a measure to defund libraries, if people had unexpectedly voted no? https://ballotpedia.org/Seattle,_Washington,_Proposition_1,_Library_Proper ty_Tax_(August_2019)

Or was there another measure I can't find? I'm not super accomplished at searching for ballot measures.
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#17  Uncle Robin 09-20-2019, 04:47 AM
Quote crich70
And remember when it was a given that if you were talking the librarian would shush you? Now days it seems people make all the noise they want regardless of the idea of courtesy.
I have several friends who are librarians, including one locally who looks after our local library's Teen/YA activities, and all are big fans of the modern approach, as opposed to the medieval approach. In our library, and in most of the libraries I've visited in my country, there is plenty of room for peaceful reading, and serious study, AND for kids and others to engage with reading and literacy in an active and vigorous manner that helps them enjoy being in a library while minimising the risk that they might think it's a tomb.
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#18  Kindleing 09-20-2019, 04:52 AM
Quote meeera
There was a ballot measure?
Not in the almost 20 years I have lived here, at least not statewide. Local property tax issues are voted on every couple of years but that isn't unique to libraries. Library funding in Washington is decided on a local basis by local voters - city, county or special district. Some pass, some don't; there are election cycles where voters have to choose among competing needs that are funded by property taxes. Typically fire protection, emergency medical services (ambulance/paramedic), law enforcement, special-purpose districts and, of course, schools can be on a local ballot for any given year. All of these combined can add up to property tax levels that make life difficult for many people. I see that in my own county where average income is nowhere near levels seen in the Seattle area.

Wally
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#19  taosaur 09-20-2019, 05:08 AM
There was a time in my teens when we were way outside of town and I'd ride my bike an hour in mostly downhill and an hour and half back mostly uphill to go to the library. My town wasn't much bigger than Lee's, but they kept the library open for generations before I got there and my nieces, nephews and little cousins still use it today.

I still keep a library card where I live now, just for Overdrive, Hoopla, Kongregate, etc. The first computer I ever owned, I went to my local library to order it online.
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#20  pwalker8 09-20-2019, 08:04 AM
Quote taosaur
There was a time in my teens when we were way outside of town and I'd ride my bike an hour in mostly downhill and an hour and half back mostly uphill to go to the library. My town wasn't much bigger than Lee's, but they kept the library open for generations before I got there and my nieces, nephews and little cousins still use it today.

I still keep a library card where I live now, just for Overdrive, Hoopla, Kongregate, etc. The first computer I ever owned, I went to my local library to order it online.
You need to get with the program! It was an hour and a half, up hill both ways!

I was telling one of my students (she was around 11 at the time) about how rough I had it when I was a kid, walking to school a mile and a half, up hill both ways, in 100 degree weather and a foot of snow! She was totally buying it up until the foot of snow, then she say "wait a minute"
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