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New Leaf Nominations for October 2018 • Out of This World: Otherwhence
#11  Catlady 09-01-2018, 11:39 PM
This is shaping up to be a month I sit out.
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#12  Bookpossum 09-02-2018, 01:41 AM
Quote Dazrin
Anyone up for a long book and not read 1Q84? Very good book but also very long (~1100 pages.)

If there isn't good interest I don't want to nominate it given the length.

I have another author I will probably nominate something from later.
I suspect the length would be rather daunting. I thought at first I hadn't read anything by Murakami, but then realised I had read After the Quake and didn't really enjoy it. So I'm rather ambivalent.
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#13  CRussel 09-02-2018, 01:43 AM
I'll third The House on the Strand by Daphne du Maurier. I don't believe I've ever read anything by her, and I should.

@Catlady: It's all about finding a book that you DO want to read that can be construed to fit the category. The range is fairly large, and that's without pushing too hard.

Personally, I'm a bit gunshy this month, and I think I'll save my tickets for seconds.
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#14  gmw 09-02-2018, 07:36 AM
I know I suggested this theme, and at the time I even suggested I was looking for science fiction nominations (and was duly and wisely corrected ), but I've gone off the idea quite a bit. That may be because some of the books I wanted to nominate are not readily available in e-book form, or that a few turned out to have been nominated before, or that one will draw all the wrong sorts of discussion, or others that have most probably been already read by anyone likely to read this sort of thing. (It's been altogether most frustrating.) It might also be partly due to the fact that I'm reading a Sci-Fi at the moment that I'm really struggling with. (I want to enjoy it, but the author is so making damn hard that I'm considering giving it up, which would make two books in a row and that has never happened to me before.) On top of all that, my VPN service has effectively stopped working with Amazon CA or US, so reliably checking availability there is now effectively impossible for me. ... So, where does that leave me?

Well, after considering and discarding around two dozen possibilities, I've decided on two nominations - either they will be available to you, or they won't, check them before voting. I apologise in advance if you can't get them. One's a classic to sit up against Ralph's nomination of Isaac Asimov's The End of Eternity. But my second nomination stretches this theme to virtual breaking point, suggesting a book that even Catlady might vote for - if she can find it.

So after such a protracted struggle, I think a drum roll is in order before ...
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#15  gmw 09-02-2018, 07:38 AM
I nominate: Against the Fall of Night by Arthur C. Clarke.

Amazon US - USD$7.75 | Amazon CA - CDN$7.99 | Amazon AU - AUD$10.55 | Kobo US - USD$8.09 | Kobo CA - CAD$8.69 | Kobo AU AUD$10.88

From Goodreads:
Quote
Living in the ten-billion-year-old city of Diaspar, Alvin is the last child born of humanity, and he is intensely curious about the outside world. But according to the oldest histories kept by the city fathers, there is no outside world—it was destroyed by the Invaders millions of years ago.

One day, Alvin finds a rock with an inscription seemingly meant for him: “There is a better way. Give my greetings to the Keeper of the Records. Alaine of Lyndar.” This cryptic message takes Alvin on a quest to discover humanity’s true past—and its future.

Originally published in the November 1948 issue of Startling Stories, Against the Fall of Night is a rich and intensely poetic vision of a distant future that’s sure to delight fans of Clarke and science fiction as a genre.
It's short, barely more than a novella (120 pages in my hardback). I strongly recommend avoiding the rather horrible sequel: Beyond the Fall of Night, written with Gregory Benford many years later. The two are often sold together, but even if you get Beyond the Fall of Night for free I suggest skipping it.

This is early Clarke and some criticise it for that early earnestness, but I like it better than some of his later work for many of the reasons others don't like it. There is much in here that Clarke doesn't try to explain; it's more human and less scientific than Clarke eventually becomes.

I recommend you check out your library options: this book is old and short, no one should be charging $10+ for this! (But some are.) Why I cannot find this on the UK sites is a mystery to me - I mean this is Arthur C. Clarke for crying out loud!
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#16  gmw 09-02-2018, 07:41 AM
I nominate: Stargazing by Peter Hill.

Amazon US - USD$9.52 ??? | Amazon UK - £6.17 | Amazon AU - AUD$12.99 | Kobo UK - £6.83 | Kobo AU AUD$12.99

From Goodreads:
Quote
In this sublime reminiscence of the pleasures of solitude, the wonders of the sea, and the odd courses life takes, Peter Hill writes, "In 1973 I worked as a lighthouse keeper on three islands off the west coast of Scotland. Before taking the job I didn't really think through what a lighthouse keeper actually did. I was attracted by the romantic notion of sitting on a rock, writing haikus and dashing off the occasional watercolor. The light itself didn't seem important: it might have been some weird coastal decoration, like candles on a Christmas tree, intended to bring cheer to those living in the more remote parts of the country."

Hill learned quickly, though, of the centuries-old mechanics of the lighthouse, of the life-and-death necessity of its luminescence to seafarers, and of the great and unlikely friendships formed out of routine. With his head filled with Hendrix, Kerouac, and the war in Vietnam, Hill shared cups of tea and close quarters with salty lighthouse keepers of an entirely different generation. The stories they told and idiosyncrasies they exhibited came to define a summer Hill has memorialized with great wit and a disarmingly affectionate style.
I stretch the theme to include this on the basis that the act of stargazing is inherently otherworldly, and because the life of a lighthouse keeper seems so far out from the ordinary as to be (almost) out of this world ... and, come to think of it, 1973 seems pretty far out of this world now too. (And, besides which, it's something altogether different which is a good thing, I think.)

It's 276 pages in my hardcover, but kobo says its only 76k words. It's certainly not a hard or arduous read. Finding this on US or Canadian sites seems to be a challenge - but it's a good read if you can find it.
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#17  Ralph Sir Edward 09-02-2018, 07:54 AM
Quote gmw
I nominate: Against the Fall of Night by Arthur C. Clarke.

Amazon US - USD$7.75 | Amazon CA - CDN$7.99 | Amazon AU - AUD$10.55 | Kobo US - USD$8.09 | Kobo CA - CAD$8.69 | Kobo AU AUD$10.88

From Goodreads:


It's short, barely more than a novella (120 pages in my hardback). I strongly recommend avoiding the rather horrible sequel: Beyond the Fall of Night, written with Gregory Benford many years later. The two are often sold together, but even if you get Beyond the Fall of Night for free I suggest skipping it.

This is early Clarke and some criticise it for that early earnestness, but I like it better than some of his later work for many of the reasons others don't like it. There is much in here that Clarke doesn't try to explain; it's more human and less scientific than Clarke eventually becomes.

I recommend you check out your library options: this book is old and short, no one should be charging $10+ for this! (But some are.) Why I cannot find this on the UK sites is a mystery to me - I mean this is Arthur C. Clarke for crying out loud!
Perhaps people prefer the re-write of the novel Clarke did in 1956. It's called The City And The Stars. Same story, rewritten, with some minor changes.
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#18  gmw 09-02-2018, 07:56 AM
Quote Ralph Sir Edward
Perhaps people prefer the re-write of the novel Clarke did in 1956. It's called The City And The Stars. Same story, rewritten, with some minor changes.
Yes, I supposed I should have mentioned that that existed, but I prefer first version.
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#19  issybird 09-02-2018, 08:16 AM
Quote Dazrin
Anyone up for a long book and not read 1Q84? Very good book but also very long (~1100 pages.)

If there isn't good interest I don't want to nominate it given the length.

I have another author I will probably nominate something from later.
Quote Bookpossum
I suspect the length would be rather daunting. I thought at first I hadn't read anything by Murakami, but then realised I had read After the Quake and didn't really enjoy it. So I'm rather ambivalent.
I also didn't much care for After the Quake when the Lit Club read it, but I suspect that wasn't the best Murakami to serve as one's introduction to him. I agree about the length of 1Q84.
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#20  gmw 09-02-2018, 08:21 AM
Quote Dazrin
Anyone up for a long book and not read 1Q84? Very good book but also very long (~1100 pages.)

If there isn't good interest I don't want to nominate it given the length.

I have another author I will probably nominate something from later.
Murakami is someone I want to try ... but probably not 1100 pages worth on my first visit.
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