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Free Library of Philadelphia
#11  JSWolf 11-21-2020, 11:25 AM
I did call FLP and they did renew my library card.
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#12  haertig 11-21-2020, 09:28 PM
Quote issybird
I think there’s a lot of abuse of library cards, frankly.
How do you abuse a library card? Are you talking about obtaining one fraudulently (falsifying your address, or something like that?)
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#13  JSWolf 11-21-2020, 10:08 PM
Quote haertig
How do you abuse a library card? Are you talking about obtaining one fraudulently (falsifying your address, or something like that?)
The person on the phone asked for the address on file and I gave it. No way to fudge the address.
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#14  Froide 11-23-2020, 09:09 AM
Quote issybird
They have. However, until 2013, FLP gave free cards to vets, members of the military and seniors, and those who obtained cards on the basis of one of those categories were grandfathered. My guess is they didn’t want to take cards away from the military and figured that they’d lose the senior and vet cards through attrition.

They were losing money even at $50, by my calculations, and even more so obviously on the free cards. I hope those who’ve been lucky enough to be grandfathered are entitled to the privilege. I think there’s a lot of abuse of library cards, frankly.
My grandfathered card is still active.

Quote haertig
How do you abuse a library card? Are you talking about obtaining one fraudulently (falsifying your address, or something like that?)
I'm also curious about what kind of abuse issybird's referring to.

Every library I belong to requires a photo ID plus proof of whatever status one needs to prove eligibility (e.g., home/school/work address, or some other documentation proving employer/school affiliation or military/veteran status).
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#15  issybird 11-23-2020, 09:30 AM
My sense is that there’s a fair amount of people using legitimate library cards that belong to other people. Say you live in the sticks but you’ve got a cousin in Seattle or Cleveland who’s given you access to his account. You’re not paying the taxes nor living in the area that would entitle you to the card, but you’re using the resources just the same. That’s one example; I can think of others.
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#16  haertig 11-23-2020, 11:55 AM
Quote issybird
You’re not paying the taxes nor living in the area that would entitle you to the card, but you’re using the resources just the same.
Libraries here actually encourage that. I am a member of ten different libraries now. I live in only one jurisdiction, and pay county taxes only for that jurisdiction. But all my library cards are legit. The libraries advertise, "If you live in our state, then you can get our library card!" These are not state libraries, they are county libraries (I'll bet they all receive state money however). You do have to travel to each library and present proof of state residency - a drivers license will do - before they'll give you a permanent card. Typically you can register online and have temporary access for about one month before having to show up in person.

This is all legitimate. Libraries advertise and encourage this. It seems they are wanting to get patrons from out-of-county, despite no direct tax revenues from those people. If I find myself driving about the state and end up in some remote county from my home, if I have time, I try to stop at their library and obtain a card (if it's a big county with at least one major city). Most of these cards are redundant. But every now and then I will find that eBook I'm wanting to read at one of these remote libraries and not at my own library. Around here, there is no such thing as an "interlibrary loan of an eBook" like there is for physical books. You have to be a member of the specific library that has the eBook to be able to check it out.
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#17  JSWolf 11-23-2020, 11:58 AM
I too have library cards from places in MA I don't pay taxes. These library cards are legit.
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#18  issybird 11-23-2020, 12:55 PM
C’mon, of course those cards are legit. Your home library is offering access to them and it’s a reciprocal deal. Sheesh.

Again, I’m talking about the cards to which you have no right whatsoever, but piggyback onto a friend’s or relative’s out of area card. I really thought I made that clear.

And sometimes people hang onto cards after they’ve moved. Just saying. Sometimes you can, but it doesn’t mean you should.

Sigh. There’s a lot of gray when it comes to digital media and people who apply their own sense of morality to the situation, and I’m not excluding myself. Some won’t strip DRM, period, because they’re party to a license agreement. Some give themselves a much broader latitude. Some strip DRM from library books for device-shifting purposes and I won’t go beyond that. Some shop “abroad.” Some shop abroad, but won’t shop public domain abroad and to others it’s the same thing. I could go on. I don’t even think our rules here are rigorously consistent.

I’m not the internet police and of course almost everyone does things from time to time that even by their own standards wouldn’t pass close scrutiny. I just wish two things: that people would be honest with themselves to the best of their ability and that they wouldn’t discuss dodgy things on the board.

Off my soapbox!
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#19  Gardenman 11-23-2020, 02:53 PM
Quote haertig
Libraries here actually encourage that. I am a member of ten different libraries now. I live in only one jurisdiction, and pay county taxes only for that jurisdiction. But all my library cards are legit. The libraries advertise, "If you live in our state, then you can get our library card!" These are not state libraries, they are county libraries (I'll bet they all receive state money however). You do have to travel to each library and present proof of state residency - a drivers license will do - before they'll give you a permanent card. Typically you can register online and have temporary access for about one month before having to show up in person.

This is all legitimate. Libraries advertise and encourage this. It seems they are wanting to get patrons from out-of-county, despite no direct tax revenues from those people. If I find myself driving about the state and end up in some remote county from my home, if I have time, I try to stop at their library and obtain a card (if it's a big county with at least one major city). Most of these cards are redundant. But every now and then I will find that eBook I'm wanting to read at one of these remote libraries and not at my own library. Around here, there is no such thing as an "interlibrary loan of an eBook" like there is for physical books. You have to be a member of the specific library that has the eBook to be able to check it out.
Do you have to renew the cards? If so do you have to go the the library to renew?
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#20  John F 11-23-2020, 03:05 PM
Quote issybird
C’mon, of course those cards are legit. Your home library is offering access to them and it’s a reciprocal deal. Sheesh.

Again, I’m talking about the cards to which you have no right whatsoever, but piggyback onto a friend’s or relative’s out of area card. I really thought I made that clear.

...
Since many had to ask what you meant, maybe it isn't as prevelent as you think?

From what I hear, it is relatively easy to get pirated ebooks on the internet, so why go through the hassle of library access?
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