Mobileread
Is anybody else spoiled for eInk displays?
#1  ownedbycats 01-19-2021, 03:44 AM
I've been using my Kobo for years now, and at this point it's almost unpleasant going back to trying to read eBooks on my monitor or even on my phone. I think I've been spoiled too much by eInk display.

Is anyone else the same way?
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#2  kandwo 01-19-2021, 04:04 AM
I don't feel spoiled by the display. At least not when it comes to just reading. In that sense I was already spoiled by physical paper books, which I still much prefer to e-ink. The contrast is incredible, the reading experience superior; you can feel the book, smell it, interact with it (turning pages, etc). With paper books the progress is physical, I don't have to worry about breaking anything and it's just more pleasant in every conceivable way.

Reading on a monitor/phone has always been an act of pure desperation - something I've done when there's been no other choice. It's horrible, hurts my eyes. I cannot concentrate or enjoy myself that well and don't remember what I've read.

I have recently bought and started using the Hisense A5 Pro and Onyx Boox Nova 3 - and yes, for phone and tablet use I feel a bit 'spoiled', maybe. On the other hand it feels like this is what technology was supposed to be like all along. As if it's finally fulfilling its promise, and not very well at that (not enough contrast, bad refresh rate, etc).

The one area where all my e-ink devices do better than books is, of course, mobility. I can carry an entire library with me at all times; and I can at any given moment add another library's worth of books to it. The versatility is also great: my phone becomes a whole language learning platform - I can read and press a word to quickly check its meaning in a dictionary, I can add it to a SRS program and so on.

Still, all in all, I am incredibly grateful for e-ink. It's one of the few uses of technology I wholly approve of. I hope it will keep getting better - I want to have a colour e-ink laptop soon! My dream would be relatively high refresh colour e-ink monitors, tablets and phones, where the colour can be disabled and enabled only when needed. That would be the pinnacle of display technology!
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#3  latepaul 01-19-2021, 04:25 AM
No.

I like eInk but I still read off a PC monitor all the time (if I couldn't cope with a monitor I couldn't do my job) and occasionally off my tablet (LCD screen). I'm less keen on my phone but that has to do with screen size rather than screen type.
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#4  Sirtel 01-19-2021, 04:57 AM
I've never read novels on anything else than eink (and paper, of course). So I've no idea, really. Certainly I strongly prefer my eink readers to paper books, which I don't particularly like anymore. (What's that obsession with the smell of paper books? I hate it.) But I still read newspaper and Wikipedia articles etc. on my computers, tablets and phone without any problems.
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#5  Sirtel 01-19-2021, 05:09 AM
Quote kandwo
I don't feel spoiled by the display. At least not when it comes to just reading. In that sense I was already spoiled by physical paper books, which I still much prefer to e-ink. The contrast is incredible, the reading experience superior; you can feel the book, smell it, interact with it (turning pages, etc). With paper books the progress is physical, I don't have to worry about breaking anything and it's just more pleasant in every conceivable way.
Funny how people differ. I find paper books quite unpleasant to read since I got my first eink reader almost 10 years ago. They're heavier, uncomfortable to hold, turning pages is more difficult, the contrast is generally poorer (to my eyes anyway) and you cannot search them. What's to like there?
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#6  ps67 01-19-2021, 12:02 PM
A friend of mine wrote a book. I told her: I'll buy it but send me the word file as well so I can make the ebook and I can read it on the Kobo or the Kindle.

I can also read paper books but I prefer ebooks except if they are art books or with large maps or similar. A couple of times I read, years ago, a whole book on the computer but it's not for me. And the phone is even worse.
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#7  pwalker8 01-19-2021, 12:04 PM
Quote Sirtel
Funny how people differ. I find paper books quite unpleasant to read since I got my first eink reader almost 10 years ago. They're heavier, uncomfortable to hold, turning pages is more difficult, the contrast is generally poorer (to my eyes anyway) and you cannot search them. What's to like there?
This is the internet, everyone knows there is only one true way to read books, the way _I_ like to read!

Pretty much the only time I read dead tree books is when that book isn't available as an ebook, though there are a small group of books whose formatting would be difficult to put in an eBook. On the other hand, my sister still likes paper books and says that she understands and remembers better when she has a paper book that she can underline and easily go back and forth. Different strokes for different folks.
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#8  DNSB 01-19-2021, 12:37 PM
Quote pwalker8
On the other hand, my sister still likes paper books and says that she understands and remembers better when she has a paper book that she can underline and easily go back and forth. Different strokes for different folks.
Underline in a book? Does she also dogear pages? And you've let her live???
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#9  ottischwenk 01-19-2021, 12:47 PM
If I want to enjoy a text, I take a paper book - even better with a leather cover and gilt edging.
If I want to quickly grasp an action, I use one of my readers with a very specific formatting: landscape format, two columns, Arial, left-justified, paragraph spacing, no first line indentation.
I read about three times as fast as with paper.
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#10  DNSB 01-19-2021, 12:59 PM
Quote ottischwenk
If I want to enjoy a text, I take a paper book - even better with a leather cover and gilt edging.
If I want to quickly grasp an action, I use one of my readers with a very specific formatting: landscape format, two columns, Arial, left-justified, paragraph spacing, no first line indentation.
I read about three times as fast as with paper.
We've long since gotten that your preference for reading on an ereader is a text file. Do you prefer to get your books uncut?

As for books with leather covers and gilt edging? They're what one of my relatives has on the shelves in her office. Her clients seem to find them very impressive though all her research is now done through computerized legal research tools -- faster, more accurate, etc.
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