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U.S. Public Domain titles added Jan 1st 2021
#11  Luffy 01-08-2021, 08:03 AM
Quote pwalker8
Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.

I suspect the real reason that the Great Gatsby is a "classic" is because the writing style appeals to literary types and since it's been around so long, many, many literary critics have projected their world views on it.

Personally, the book never did anything for me. I really liked the Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck though, so different strokes for different folks.
I'm no dyed in the wool defender of said book, but I was more drawn to its writing than I thought I would be. I reserve my dislike for many big books that are classics.
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#12  issybird 01-08-2021, 09:43 AM
Quote pwalker8
I suspect the real reason that the Great Gatsby is a "classic" is because the writing style appeals to literary types and since it's been around so long, many, many literary critics have projected their world views on it.
Maybe it’s been around so long because it’s that good?

One mark of a classic is that it’s open to different interpretations over time. Classics live; there’s a universality to them. Jane Eyre is one example of this; the understanding of Bertha Rochester is far different now that it was a century and a half ago.

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Personally, the book never did anything for me. I really liked the Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck though, so different strokes for different folks.
That’s quite the non sequitur.
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#13  pwalker8 01-08-2021, 02:56 PM
Quote issybird
Maybe it’s been around so long because it’s that good?

One mark of a classic is that it’s open to different interpretations over time. Classics live; there’s a universality to them. Jane Eyre is one example of this; the understanding of Bertha Rochester is far different now that it was a century and a half ago.



That’s quite the non sequitur.
You do realize that Grapes of Wrath was written in 1939, is considered an American classic and is taught in school don't you? Hardly a non sequitur since I was pointing out that there are other American classics that do appeal to me.

Understanding of a book doesn't change over time, unless new information comes out about it. Projections onto a book change all the time. That hardly is the hallmark of a classic. The fact that it's still being read after almost 100 years makes it a classic, even if I don't particularly care for it. The Sherlock Holmes stories are classics because people still enjoy them after all this time, not because literary critics continue to put out new projections onto Sherlock Holmes and Watson.
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#14  issybird 01-08-2021, 03:22 PM
Quote pwalker8
You do realize that Grapes of Wrath was written in 1939, is considered an American classic and is taught in school don't you?
Oh, my, do tell. That Steinbeck! The one who won what Paul Krugman rather gracelessly called “the Swedish thingie.”

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Hardly a non sequitur since I was pointing out that there are other American classics that do appeal to me.
Your contrast of Gatsby and Grapes seems akin to someone saying, “I don’t like watermelon but I like hamburgers.” The relationship is tenuous.

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Understanding of a book doesn't change over time, unless new information comes out about it. Projections onto a book change all the time. That hardly is the hallmark of a classic. The fact that it's still being read after almost 100 years makes it a classic, even if I don't particularly care for it. The Sherlock Holmes stories are classics because people still enjoy them after all this time, not because literary critics continue to put out new projections onto Sherlock Holmes and Watson.
I specifically said the understanding of Bertha Rochester; you don’t think the advances in knowledge of psychology and mental illness can alter our interpretation of what happens with her character? What Brontë wrote in the 1840s was true and what we know now is another truth. It’s a mark of the greatness of the book. I don’t even know what new information coming out about a book would mean. The book is the text.

I also think we have a difference in our understanding of cause and effect. Books last because they’re good, so far we’re in agreement. But I think part of what makes a book great over time is that it doesn’t date; it keeps pace with our changing understanding of times and people. What you’re calling a “projection”, I call advances in knowledge. I can’t help thinking it’s on par with your not-so-concealed sneer at “literary types.” Why does it matter to you who likes a book and why and how they appreciate it?
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#15  ZodWallop 01-11-2021, 09:39 PM
Quote binaryhermit
I'm about a third of the way through "The Great Gatsby" (after IIRC having read it in HS almost 20 years ago) and all I can think about is that it's massively overrated
A work of art not connecting to you isn't necessarily overrated.

I don't enjoy Quentin Tarantino's movies. But I wouldn't say he's overrated. Just doesn't connect to me.
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#16  binaryhermit 01-11-2021, 09:41 PM
That's probably a better way to put it, I apologize (probably even though I really don't need to).
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#17  Luffy 01-14-2021, 10:15 AM
Quote binaryhermit
That's probably a better way to put it, I apologize (probably even though I really don't need to).
Damn right. People know from habit when one is being subjective on a forum. Happy Reading.
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#18  fjtorres 01-15-2021, 07:30 PM
Quote hildea
I'm looking forward to this reimagining of Gatsby!
What about Jay Gatsby, Vampire?

https://www.cnet.com/news/vampire-great-gatsby-f-scott-fitzgeralds-classic-novel-gets-undead-spin/

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The famous novel's now officially in the public domain, which means new editions are on the way, including a graphic novel and a horror adaptation.
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The original Great Gatsby takes place during the Jazz Age in New York City and tells the tragic story of self-made millionaire Jay Gatsby and his romantic pursuit of a wealthy young woman named Daisy Buchanan whom he was in love with in his youth. In the new book The Great Gatsby Undead, the characters are the same, only creepier.

"Nick Carraway meets his mysterious neighbor, Jay Gatsby. Gatsby doesn't seem to eat anything and has an aversion to silver, garlic and the sun, but good friends are hard to come by. Especially an interesting millionaire like Gatsby," The Great Gatsby Undead book description reads.

"When Gatsby asks Nick to help catch a murderer, Nick just can't say no. And, of course, Nick agrees to set up a tea date for his cousin Daisy and Gatsby. It's harmless to reunite two old friends, until Nick realizes the truth he's known, deep down, the entire time. Jay Gatsby is a vampire."
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#19  khalleron 01-28-2021, 05:33 PM
Quote binaryhermit
That's probably a better way to put it, I apologize (probably even though I really don't need to).
This is what is known as a non-apology.

You can't apologize and not apologize at the same time.
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#20  pwalker8 01-29-2021, 07:11 AM
Quote khalleron
This is what is known as a non-apology.

You can't apologize and not apologize at the same time.
Sure you can, politicians do it all the time.
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