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Spiritual Various: Bible: World English Version
#11  JSWolf 08-11-2007, 01:36 PM
Quote gingercat
Quick Update - I have begun to create the WEB for the reader and started with an 11 point font. This gives me no problems selecting any of the 3 font sizes so I am picking the crashes might have something to do with the particular font chosen in the crashing version
The WEB is?

Are you using Book Designer or html2lrf? If Book Designer, have you tried the latest version posted in the Sticky in the Reader Content forum?
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#12  HarryT 08-11-2007, 01:47 PM
Quote JSWolf
The WEB is?
The "World English Bible". Unlike most Bible translations, which are carried out by multi-denominational committees, and aim to achieve both accuracy and balance, the WEB was done by a small group of people with a rather one-sided "evangelical" agenda. Few people would recommend it as a "good" translation. One of its few "benefits" is that it's freely available on the internet and is in the public domain ("WEB" is a deliberate play on words).

See:

http://www.ebible.org/
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#13  JSWolf 08-11-2007, 01:54 PM
My Wife purchased a bible that is as neutral as possible. It's a direct translation of the original Hebrew. Does such exist as a free edition in electronic form?
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#14  HarryT 08-11-2007, 02:00 PM
There are many older translations of the bible that are now in the public domain - eg the "American Standard Version" of 1901. I'm not aware off-hand of any very "literal" transations; they tend not to be very readable because the grammatical structure of Hebrew is so radically different from that of English. You have to "paraphrase" to get readable English.

I'm sure you're aware of this, but only the Old Testament was originally written in Hebrew; the New Testament was written in Greek.
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#15  beartard 08-11-2007, 03:20 PM
Good luck with that, man. Every translation, by its very nature, involves some bias and interpretation on the part of its translators.

Just as a small example, the passage in Isaiah that's often seen as a prophecy about the birth of Jesus says that either a "young woman" or a "virgin" will conceive. I doubt any Jewish translators would opt for the latter, given a bias against Christian interpretation. Few Christian translators would opt for the former, since it's been viewed for over 2000 years as phrophetic. Which translation is more "literal" is a debate that can't be won. When you use the word "literal" is it more important to understand what the words themselves mean, or what the human author meant by them? In that sense, saying any translation is more "literal" than another is on the verge of meaningless.

That's one plus for Islam, which claims that no translation of the Qur'an is authoritative. But then, the texts of the Qur'an are significantly more recent than either the Hebrew or the Aramaic/Greek scriptures.

One problem I've found is that many older Bible translations into English (and therefore public domain) didn't have the benefit of comparison and revision to be in accord with older, original manuscripts that had been discovered after they were published. Of course, there are always those who say that the KJV is the literal word of God since all the more modern translations disagree with it. ;-)

I tend to take exception with the WEB translators' position on "drop-outs" as they call them. Many of the newly-found, older manuscripts that have been discovered are significantly shorter than those used by the translators of years past. The logic of the WEB group is that a scribe would be more likely to miss a line here or there, causing a drop-out, than adding one in later on. This simply isn't true. Many scribes added glosses to the text for further explanation, filling in gaps for the curious, or even for devotional use (such as the "for thine is the kingdom...." ending to the Lord's Prayer.) These eventually found their way into older English Bibles and were seen as actual parts of the scriptures--something that was never intended. My personal view is "the shorter, the better" or at least, more authentic.

Translation is always a dangerous business. And I'd hate to have the job of a scriptural translator. Talk about pressure!
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#16  edbro 08-11-2007, 08:25 PM
I've been considering purchasing the NIV version in Palm format. But, I'd like to know if it will convert properly with the TOC? I've used ABC Palm Converter to successfully convert PalmDocs before but, there were no TOCs involved then.
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#17  pcinfoman 08-13-2007, 10:05 AM
Quote gingercat
For some strange reason it crashes my reader when I try to change the font size - I'd like to look into that to find out why as well.
I am having the same problem. Now that it is set at the size that crashes the Reader, I cannot resize it anymore or navigate pages. I have to delete it.

In addition, it shows up on my Reader with a title of "bible" and no author. Can we modify this to give it a title of "Bible" and an author of "World English Version" please?
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#18  JSWolf 08-13-2007, 10:21 AM
This book has a bit over 6000 pages at size small. So it could be that changing the font size just takes a good long time. How long have you given it to change the font size?
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#19  pcinfoman 08-13-2007, 11:10 AM
Quote JSWolf
This book has a bit over 6000 pages at size small. So it could be that changing the font size just takes a good long time. How long have you given it to change the font size?
I let it sit for about 10 minutes.
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#20  JSWolf 08-13-2007, 11:23 AM
Were the arrows moving in a circle?
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