Mobileread
Augmented Reality - Epson Moverio BT-300
#11  mdp 04-05-2019, 11:12 AM
Quote bango
Mdp's reconstruction pics are extremely accurate when using an inverted colour scheme
But I compromised in making a few details precise, I wanted to give a fair idea without spending the effort needed to make it a fully faithful reconstruction.

Do you also have the display contents alternating focus and out-of-focus?
As in "Do you also have the display contents"
where with black I meant "in focus" and with grey "out of focus".

And the areas out of focus become in focus (while others lose it) if you move the glasses farther or closer or if you pan them to the left or right.
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#12  bango 04-23-2019, 11:12 AM
Sorry for the late reply but yes there is a bit of that effect more near the edges of the display. Overall I didn't really notice it.

You were able to walk and read at the same time? I found I couldn't. sitting down outside reading or looking out a window was good though.
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#13  mdp 05-26-2019, 10:02 AM
Quote bango
Sorry for the late reply but yes there is a bit of that effect more near the edges of the display. Overall I didn't really notice it
(No prob.) I suspect it must be something with individual eyes.

Quote bango
You were able to walk and read at the same time? I found I couldn't. sitting down outside reading or looking out a window was good though.
It's the opposite for me: I find the quality optimal as I read while walking. What I really experienced unnatural is to use them while sitting in the dark.
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#14  avshadler 06-10-2019, 01:48 PM
I found MobileRead by googling moverio and book reading.

The comments on this thread are very interesting!!

Motion sickness is often caused by discordant information on where your head is relation to your body and the world. When you are reading with a virtual image device -- like the Moverio[TM Epson] -- the page image moves exactly with your head -- against a real-world background. If most of the field of view is real-world , the moving image reinforces the sense of where your head is in relation to your body and the world -- and produces a mildly pleasurable sensation. For me, it worked when I rotated my head from side to side at about .5 to .3 Hz. [I was using a gadget that I made myself -- for another purpose] I suspect that , like motion sickness , the effect is very variable from person to person . If the effect is real and widespread , it may make reading more enjoyable -- with special benefit for those who are chronically or temporarily mobility impaired. Maybe people who have a Moverio or a similar device can make "Virtual Swing" parties to test the extent of this phenomenon

Reading with Moverio or other suitable Face Mounted Display [FMD] enables reading with both hands free -- to eat , knit, read instructions and work with your hands -- or maybe even nurse a baby.

It also lets you read in the dark without disturbing others -- or read where there is no space to hold a book -- like a crowded subway or sleeping bag.

It makes possible reading with very bright imagery -- which is important for older people -- while not requiring high power lamps -- which might also be disturbing to others nearby.

It may allow reading in cars or other situations where there is too much vibration -- if there is a comfortable -- maybe personalized --nose-piece.

Another advantage is that you can read with your eyes focused at a distance -- instead of close up -- which may be beneficial in reducing the tendency for book reading intensive people to develop myopia .

Epson Moverio is not intended primarily for reading -- though its OLED micro-displays have full color pixels that are theoretically only 1 minute of arc on a side when viewed through their optics. The actual image quality probably depends on exactly where the user's eyes are in relation to the system optics -- which depends on their interpupilary distance and the distance of their eyes from the see-through screen. It probably also depends on whether they are looking at the center of the page image or the corner and whether the image is black text on a white background , or vice versa -- or colored . Someone with a moverio might like to run a resolution test with a resolution test target on the screen.

Moverio's see-thru optics and the need to see imagery against a bright sky background make it relatively power hungry. A system designed primarily for reading -- and not see through -- could be extremely efficient in energy use --and very good for back packers and people who are off the grid.

I am working on the development of something I call the Personal Reader[TM]. At this point it looks like we can make a 50 gram device that enables you to read with both eyes for hours at a time without eyestrain The images are sharp, clear i-pad/page size/ portrait oriented and full color. The best compromise at this point appears to be the equivalent of a 8x6 inch information area at 50 cm -- or about a 10 inch 28 degree diagonal.
The 50 cm reading distance is based on what people choose when they are looking forward, reading 10 point type and the screen or page image is decoupled from the need to hold something in their hand.

[When people hold printed documents in their hands they average about 40 cm]

Devices with both larger and smaller angular page sizes will probably also be developed.

It should also fit in a shirt pocket and cost on the order of $50-200 -- depending on production volume and the cost of suitable micro-display.

It needs only one microdisplay for bi-ocular imagery and both Epson & Sony already have the technology to make the kind of microdisplay that we need -- at least for starters. Our system is designed so that the micro-display can be upgraded /replaced as better versions become available or if there is "burnout" when used in very high brightness modes.

Our system can also be used as a passive microscope --and can be used to read microfiche on ambient light. The result is that it can be used on the Sabbath by Sabbath Observant Jews -- for reading books on microfiche.

If you would like to see a published, one page poster from a SID Dresden 2017 Europe conference on this-- with an update to this month -- -- I would be glad to send it to you as an attachment [avshadler@yahoo.com]
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#15  FrustratedReader 06-16-2019, 01:13 PM
50cm is far to far for less than 14 pt!
40cm is about right.
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#16  avshadler 06-17-2019, 08:44 AM
40 cm is good for hand held reading of 10 point type . When the reading distance is decoupled from the need to hold something in your hand -- and the person is looking more in the forward direction than down, the average measured chosen reading distance is greater than 50 cm for the equivalent of ten point type.

See: For normative data on reading 10 point type from a hand held document: SOME NORMATIVE DATA ON READING DISTANCE
DONALD H. SCHUSTER, GEORGE G. KARAS DOUGLAS C. ANTONELLI
Iowa Stare University IBM Systems Development
Division, Rochester, Minn. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 1969, 28, 202.

Hand held reading distance for ten point type is slightly less for young -- high school graduate -- women that for hs grad. young men -- possibly because the women have arms that are about 10-12% shorter.

For normative data on reading 12 point type from printed document taped to a vertical screen and the same document held in the hands. See: "Working distance and eye and head movements during near work in myopes and non-myopes", Andreas Hartwig, et al, Clinical and Experimental Optometry 94.6 November 2011

and "Analysis of head position used by myopes and emmetropes when performing a near-vision reading task"Andreas Hartwig, et al,Vision Research 51 (2011) 1712–1717

The weight, bulk and cost of the system varies in some respects as the cube of the angular image size. The shorter the reading distance , the greater the angular image size. We hope to come out with a basic size and a smaller and larger size to accommodate the great majority of book readers.
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#17  FrustratedReader 06-17-2019, 10:06 AM
Quote avshadler
40 cm is good for hand held reading of 10 point type . When the reading distance is decoupled from the need to hold something in your hand -- and the person is looking more in the forward direction than down, the average measured chosen reading distance is greater than 50 cm for the equivalent of ten point type.
That has to be for people with at least average vision, not needing glasses, i.e. their focus has good accommodation. Also with a particular contrast, clear font, and good lighting.

It's simply not generally true.
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#18  FrustratedReader 06-17-2019, 10:09 AM
Quote avshadler
Hand held reading distance for ten point type is slightly less for young -- high school graduate -- women that for hs grad. young men -- possibly because the women have arms that are about 10-12% shorter.
and larger size to accommodate the great majority of book readers.
Nothing to do with arm length!
Also Ethnic background, culture, writing system?

These seem like pretty poor & biased studies.

Any system is going to have to accommodate glasses unless it can separately do all the kinds of vision correction each eye needs, as even without astigmatism etc a long sighted or short sighted or person needing glasses for reading AND distance may need a different lens for each eye.

Too many products seem designed by US English speaking "white American males" for English speaking young white American males.

Or for an "average" (few people are "average") person rather than say 95% of people. Even stupid stuff like Men's shoes no smaller than UK 7, or Women's shoes no larger than UK 7.

Or designed for "average" size finger tips, finger length and grip size. Average is meaningless for human physical characteristics. The variation is enormous.
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#19  avshadler 06-17-2019, 11:54 AM
Glad to hear from you!!

The Personal Reader is designed to go with prescription lenses if a person needs them. For a book that is in a format that is not restricted to a particular page size, the user can change the size of the font to as large or as small as they want. For those with cloudy media, they can change to thin white -- or colored -- letters on a dark background. For those who need much brighter light -- people in their 70's need about ten times the brightness for the same quality of reading experience as a person of 20 years -- the brightness can be increased by a factor of ten or more without worrying too much about burning out the system -- or disturbing other people nearby who are trying to sleep.

The studies of reading distance that I cited are biased by age -- the subjects were generally younger people 17-45 or so. They are also biased by other factors -- as you pointed out. But since people can change the size of the font -- in whatever writing system -- to suit their visual needs -- it should work across writing systems and cultures. I hope that we will be able to study the needs of all those who might benefit from the Personal Reader – so that we can tailor our efforts to do the most good.

Here are specific numbers from the study on normative reading distance . "…37 male and 41 female high school graduates. All were checked for 20/20 vision; 69% wore glasses. …They could hold the 10-point typewritten material anywhere desired… maximum distance 28.0 in., 95 centile, 21.6 in., median 15.8 in., 5th centile 10.0 in., minimum 7.5 in., M 16.2 in., and SD 3.4 in. There was an interesting but slight correlation of 0.175 (p = .01, 200 data points) between S's sex and voluntary reading distance. Girls tended to hold the paper slightly closer than boys; for all practical purposes, this effect was insignificant. A final interesting observation concerned the 69% who wore glasses. Wearing glasses was not associated with holding the stimulus sheet closer to the eyes (r = 0.035 between wearing glasses and reading distance)."

It was my idea that the difference in reading distance between the young men and women in this sample had to do with the length of their arms—since women's arms are 10% shorter than men's arms in this age group among the US population.

Notice that within the central 90% of the sample ratio of the longest to the shortest reading distance is 2.16:1 and between the extremes is this sample of only 70 people , it is 28:7.5 – almost a factor of 4.

At present our main design is 50 grams[ excluding prescription lenses ] , fits in a shirt pocket and presents a bright, sharp clear, full color, biocular image that is in portrait mode, with a 28 degree diagonal --about the size of and shape of a standard ipad at 50 cm from the eye. It is designed for comfortable sustained reading – not thrills with headaches. We also plan designs for those who prefer longer and shorter reading distances – though these may have different angular image sizes and weights.

If you have other studies of reading distance of other groups , writing systems etc., I hope that you will bring them to our attention .
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#20  FrustratedReader 06-18-2019, 10:53 AM
I hope it goes well. I've seen many good ideas bite the dust due to greedy Vulture Capitalists, Marketing, Bean counters, HR and inept managers. Never because it wasn't economically and technically possible.
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