Mobileread
eBook Reader ergonomics discussion
#41  mr ploppy 05-23-2010, 04:04 PM
Touch screen is the spawn of Stan. You spend years telling your kids never to touch the screen, then someone invents a screen that you have to poke to make it do stuff.

I also prefer the flip up/wrap around covers so that you can hold it like a real book. Or failing that, a large non-screen and buttonless area at the bottom so that you can hold it with one thumb on the front. Being wrong handed, most of them have the buttons on the wrong side, too.
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#42  Teddman 06-08-2010, 06:40 PM
I recently got a Book Seat and I'm loving it. It's sort of a cushion crossed with a lectern, and my 505 fits perfectly in the suede "seat." The optional page holder works pretty well for holding the 505's cover open, though I guess it would be even better to simply take the cover off.

With a couple couch pillows on my lap and the Book Seat on top of that, the reader is just about at eye level, and this make a noticeable difference in comfort. I'm no longer getting a crick in my neck from staring at my lap and my hands don't get tired from holding the 505. Sounds lazy but after an hour or two it can get on your nerves!

Now if I could just get a remote control so that I don't even have to lift my arm to hit the page turn button...
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#43  Dulin's Books 06-08-2010, 08:32 PM
i think ergonomic wise the best thing is to allow the customers to map the keys like Pocketbook does. I too like the upper wing button on the 360 to be next page but some people want the bottom one to be next page because they hold it differently than i do.

Touch screen gestures need to allow mapping as well. I might be comfortable swiping from right to left to change the page but someone else might want to "drag" up to change to the next page.

rotation is also key. i prefer my buttons on the side of the display but others want them at the bottom. all readers should be able to rotate to up/down/left/right.

Quote Spiffy
Incidentally... how well does the thing with FBReader and the 360's accelerometer work? .
fantastically. its very well thought out and it has been tweaked since introduced. it allows you to modify when the page turn happens by degrees in steps of 5 degrees from 20-70 degrees. So you can set it for 20 if you want to happen with very little tilt or you can set it for 45 if you worry about extraneous page turns. you can also set it to only turn forward so if you dont have to worry that you've suddenly gone back a page.

silent, one-handed page turning that works amazingly well
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#44  Maggie Leung 06-09-2010, 12:10 AM
Quote Teddman
I recently got a Book Seat and I'm loving it. It's sort of a cushion crossed with a lectern, and my 505 fits perfectly in the suede "seat." The optional page holder works pretty well for holding the 505's cover open, though I guess it would be even better to simply take the cover off.

With a couple couch pillows on my lap and the Book Seat on top of that, the reader is just about at eye level, and this make a noticeable difference in comfort. I'm no longer getting a crick in my neck from staring at my lap and my hands don't get tired from holding the 505. Sounds lazy but after an hour or two it can get on your nerves!

Now if I could just get a remote control so that I don't even have to lift my arm to hit the page turn button...
I use a homemade version of this: I yanked the stuffing out of a cushion, poured in rice. Works great. With the cushion and rice, I think I spent five bucks.
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#45  Michel Kin 07-11-2010, 10:01 PM
I like the true flip effects most. Coming with the voice of turning pages while reading would really be awesome, as the ebooks on-line does so.
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#46  LuBiB 07-12-2010, 10:14 AM
my top most important additions to eReader ergonomics have to be:

- size (preferably fitting into my pocket)

- weight

- readability (how long i can read before getting tired - color screens and backlit screens wont ever allow reading for a prolong period of time)

- design (has to sit in my hands properly without the feel like its gonna fall out)

i currently have the jetBook and jetBook LITE which occupy my 4 dimensions of compatibility (i sound like an eHarmony commercial lol)......i do love it and i think ereaders should have those 4 points down packed to be successful.
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#47  jj2me 07-12-2010, 06:01 PM
Quote troymc
Oh, I completely disagree. I think the 505 with a cover is just about perfect ergonomically. If I hold it open with my left hand, like a paperback, my left thumb is right on the left-side page turn buttons. If I hold it with my right hand, my right thumb is right on the right-side page turn buttons. Even in landscape it's just about perfect in my left hand.
I agree 100% with you, Troy. The Sony 505's left-hand buttons are perfect for left-handed-only use, provided:
Or at least I used to think so. Odd how differently we are each shaped. So after reading the dissenting views, I will no longer marvel at the designers' acumen in button placement every time I read left-handed.

P.S. I hate the concave indent on the 505's right buttons--I've glued on plastic bumpers.

P.P.S. Recovering now from shoulder surgery, where it's desirable to immobilize against any shoulder muscle tightening, I've learned to not consider buying any e-reader that can't be read with either hand (i.e., it must have buttons on each side, or software to flip text for button use on either side).
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#48  radius 07-12-2010, 06:07 PM
Quote Spiffy
Obviously different people have different tolerances (and you may have a much bigger one), but what I see in that first picture (your left hand pic) is you putting all the weight onto your fingers--the palm of your hand isn't involved at all. And that's where, for most people I think, the strength and stability is--using their palm to distribute the weight load. If you just use your fingers, all the strain is transferred pretty much directly to your wrist. Not that its immediately that heavy, but over time I think its cumulative.

Of course what we can't see from that picture is if the unit is also leaning on something at the same time. If so, that would explain the lack of finger/wrist strain.
I hold my Sony 505 the same way that troymc does in the first and third pictures.

When holding it in my left hand, I don't think I feel the strain that you are talking about because I hold the reader fairly vertically, so I don't need that much muscle and tendon strength to support it. This might be because I often read while standing on the bus instead of sitting down.

When I sit down, I often hold it as in picture 3. I support the book at the spine using my left hand and press either the original page turn button or the right navigator button to flip pages.
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