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Problems installing Sigil on MacBook Air
#1  Ashjuk 02-28-2021, 11:37 AM
I'm having an issue installing Sigil on my MacBook.

Firstly I have to confess I'm not that up on the Mac way of working, and normally just restrict the use of my Mac to browsing the Internet and syncing my iPhone.

With the work on editing the user manual I thought I would see what Sigil looked like on the Mac and maybe take a few screen shots.

I have downloaded the archive, uncompressed it with the built in tool and dragged Sigil to Applications. This all went fine, but every time I try to open it I get the error message that it can't be opened because Apple can't check it for malware.

Now I'm stuck...
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#2  KevinH 02-28-2021, 12:12 PM
This is Apple's new GateKeeper in Action. First check your Apple Settings and select Security & Privacy and then the General tab. Under it check Allow apps downloaded from AppStore and identified developers.

Then once you have that set, you should be able to do the following:

1. the Mac *.txz file from our Releases Page
2. Move it out of Downloads onto your Desktop
3. Double-click to unpack it and it will show the Sigil.app
4. Move that Sigil.app to /Applications
5. In /Applications right click on the Sigil.app and in the pop-up menu select "Open"
macOS will warn you it fear raising warning
6. Immediately afterwards use the right click to show the pop-up menu and select "Open" once again

This should then validate the code against my digital signature and you should not be bothered again.

Please note for many graphical plugins to work you should download and install the ActiveState's Active TCL version 8.6.X (the latest 8.6 version). This will enable the plugin Tk graphics as the version that comes pre.installed on macOS is much much too old to be useful.

Just ask if you have any questions.

KevinH
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#3  Ashjuk 02-28-2021, 12:36 PM
Thanks Kevin

I will try that tomorrow when I have some time to go thorough it properly.

I'm much happier with Windows as I have been using it since it was a DOS add-on, but everyone keeps telling me Macs are so much better so perhaps it's time I learned a bit more about them.
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#4  exaltedwombat 02-28-2021, 06:45 PM
Quote Ashjuk
everyone keeps telling me Macs are so much better so perhaps it's time I learned a bit more about them.
Not everyone!
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#5  exaltedwombat 02-28-2021, 06:47 PM
Quote Ashjuk
everyone keeps telling me Macs are so much better so perhaps it's time I learned a bit more about them.
Not everyone! But yes, knowledge is good.

For some reason, eBook construction seems to attract Linux diehards.
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#6  Ashjuk 03-01-2021, 04:24 AM
Quote exaltedwombat
Not everyone! But yes, knowledge is good.

For some reason, eBook construction seems to attract Linux diehards.
I've dabbled with a few Linux distros over the years - there is probably a VM one lurking somewhere on my PC even now - but I always go back to Windows!

As I said, I have been using Windows since version 1 (it was a run-time version that was bundled with the Ventura desktop publishing software if anyone is old enough to remember that) and have used pretty much every version since.

I bought the Mac mainly because of it's instant on, I can flip it open and start using it right away. I have had numerous Windows laptops over the years and none of them ever seemed to be able to do that properly.

I suppose I really should learn more about how it works.
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#7  BetterRed 03-01-2021, 05:39 AM
Pretty sure Ventura came with GEM from Digital Research rather than Windows. Don Heiskell did a lot of the development of GEM at DRI and then went on to develop Ventura.

BR
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#8  Ashjuk 03-01-2021, 08:32 AM
Quote BetterRed
Pretty sure Ventura came with GEM from Digital Research rather than Windows. Don Heiskell did a lot of the development of GEM at DRI and then went on to develop Ventura.

BR
It was a long time ago now and I thought it was an early version of Windows, but now that you mention GEM it is starting to ring bells so you are probably correct.
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#9  exaltedwombat 03-01-2021, 07:06 PM
Quote Ashjuk
I bought the Mac mainly because of it's instant on, I can flip it open and start using it right away. I have had numerous Windows laptops over the years and none of them ever seemed to be able to do that properly.
My cheap Windows laptop is pretty good at recovering from standby. The 'big' computer boots very quickly from SSD, so no need.

Are Mac uses especially prone to going long stretches between boots? When supporting Sibelius, the music score publishing program, it always seems to be Mac users who have to be recommended a cold boot when random and bizarre glitches appear. And I think Mac has a special utility to fix when the system loses track of its fonts, something that just doesn't happen on Windows.
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#10  Ashjuk 03-02-2021, 03:50 AM
Quote exaltedwombat
My cheap Windows laptop is pretty good at recovering from standby. The 'big' computer boots very quickly from SSD, so no need.

Are Mac uses especially prone to going long stretches between boots? When supporting Sibelius, the music score publishing program, it always seems to be Mac users who have to be recommended a cold boot when random and bizarre glitches appear. And I think Mac has a special utility to fix when the system loses track of its fonts, something that just doesn't happen on Windows.
I have to say the only time my Macbook gets rebooted is when there is a system update, other than that it just sits sleeping. To be honest I have never noticed any problem that has necessitated a reboot, but I am not a heavy user so that might be a factor.

As you say a SSD does make a big difference. One of the reasons I went for the Mac is that it comes with a SSD as standard.
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