Mobileread
Copyright infringement terminology
#11  mrscoach 03-02-2010, 08:47 AM
I find myself in the first and third camps, mostly, but also agreeing with some of the second camps points. I find this all fascinating because I am currently studying instructional technology for a class (just started) and we are looking into Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants.

A Native is someone who grew up with computers and all the digital media we have today. They speak the language fluently, and are the multi-tasking, forward thinkers of tomorrow. An Immigrant is someone who grew up before computers and, while making adjustments and learning the language, still have an 'accent'. They do not automatically turn to the internet for research, emails might be followed up with a phone call to see if it was received, instead of sending a link to an interesting website they would call others into their office to see.

I would honestly have to place myself in the Immigrant category, just going by the fact that I didn't touch a computer until a senior in high school, and then to learn 'basic' programming. I am pretty much bilingual now, but find myself reverting to my native ways at times.

I am wondering where those on each side would find themselves, as 'Natives' or 'Immigrants'. That might shed some light on our thoughts. Should I start a poll, just for kicks?
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#12  kennyc 03-02-2010, 09:46 AM
My first "computer use" was an analog kit I built when a teenager in the early 60's. Didn't really have exposure to digital computers until about '72 or so when I began to learn programming in Basic as an extracurricular activity during my first year of college. I continued to study and learn electronics and computer and eventually got my degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and have been fully immersed for almost 30 years now....I guess that puts me in the "immigrant" category, but feel more like a native than most since I grew along with and am "in the industry."
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#13  khalleron 03-02-2010, 09:51 AM
Oh no! It's a 'need a new word thread'! Has Dan Bloom hijacked PDurrant's ID?
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#14  kennyc 03-02-2010, 09:55 AM
I think we should call it "Deft" that's my nomination. (better than liesues or whatever that silly word is )
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#15  pdurrant 03-02-2010, 10:08 AM
Quote khalleron
Oh no! It's a 'need a new word thread'! Has Dan Bloom hijacked PDurrant's ID?
No, I'm still me (I think). But yes, I regret that this is, in essence, a 'need a new word' thread.

But perhaps the incidental discussion will, for once, generate more light than heat.
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#16  pdurrant 03-02-2010, 10:13 AM
Quote kennyc
I think we should call it "Deft" that's my nomination.
Could that possibly be a portmanteau word from "digital" and "theft"? At least it's pronounceable. A shame it's already in use as an adjective.
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#17  kennyc 03-02-2010, 10:15 AM
Quote pdurrant
Could that possibly be a portmanteau word from "digital" and "theft"? At least it's pronounceable. A shame it's already in use as an adjective.

Hee-Hee. You caught me.

We could "noun" it!
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#18  pdurrant 03-02-2010, 10:21 AM
Quote kennyc
Hee-Hee. You caught me.

We could "noun" it!
I never heard of anyone nouning an adjective., especially where the meaning isn't the same:

He deftly defted the ebook onto his computer...

No, I don't think so!
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#19  yekim54 03-02-2010, 10:25 AM
Quote pdurrant
Suggestions for a new term welcome.
DADT - "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"
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#20  Shaggy 03-02-2010, 10:41 AM
Quote pdurrant
The question of how to describe the act of obtaining a first digital copy of copyright material without the copyright holder's permission has frequently appeared on Mobileread.
yeah, only about a billion times.

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But it's just occurred to me that there might be room for compromise. Because copyright infringement applies to any unauthorised copying. If I buy an ebook, and then duplicate it 1,00 times, I have infringed on the copyright.
Maybe, depends on what you were doing with it.

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For example, Amazon's terms of use for ebooks does not grant me the right to make backup copies of content, only "to keep a permanent copy of the applicable Digital Content ". (emphasis added)
That's not copyright infringement, that's breach of contract (assuming the terms of that contract were legally enforceable). Violating the terms of use doesn't have anything to do with copyright in this case.

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So what's the difference between infringing copyright by burning a copy of a purchased ebook to CD-R for back-up, and infringing copyright by downloading a copy from some dodgy server on the internet?
Neither one of those is direct copyright infringement.

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Is it possible to come up with a term for the act of obtaining digital copyright material without payment or the permission of the copyright holder that both groups could agree on, that distinguishes between innocuous copyright infringement on the one hand, and actual theft on the other?
It's not clear that what you are describing above is even illegal. There are lots of scenarios where you can legally obtain digital content without either payment or permission.
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