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Children Nesbit, Edith: Royal Children of English History (illus). v1. 29 Jul 2019
#1  GrannyGrump 07-29-2019, 05:00 AM
ROYAL CHILDREN OF ENGLISH HISTORY BY Edith Nesbit (1858–1924)
Illustrated by Frances Brundage (1854–1937) and M. Bowley (No data found)

Royal Children of English History was first published in 1897 in two volumes. NB: It seems that most, if not all, of the freely available editions online (Gutenberg version) only contain the 6 stories from "Book I" of the original publication. The version presented here contains all 12 stories.

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Written by children’s author extraordinaire Edith Nesbit in the heydey of Victoria’s reign, this short volume features notable English kings and queens, beginning with Alfred the Great and ending with Victoria Regina, with a nice sprinkling of history, folk tales, mentions of Shakespeare, and gentle didactic intended to encourage piety and to stiffen the young British spine.

Worth reading for the stories themselves, which are interestingly told, and for the style of the times.
(—Goodreads review)

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Edith Nesbit Bland, English author and poet, published approximately 40 books for children under the name of E. Nesbit. Her innovative body of work combined realistic, contemporary children in real-world settings with magical objects and adventures, and influenced many subsequent fantasy writers. She also published over two dozen novels and story collections for adults. Some of her best known books are Five Children and It (from the Psammead series), The Story of the Treasure Seekers (from the Bastables series), and The Railway Children.

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Table of Contents and List of Illustrations have one-way links to content. Embedded fonts. Editing notes are available inside the book.


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Recommended for young readers (and their adults) as a simple overview of some of the highlights of British history. Note that some folk-tales and Shakespearean scenes are sometimes not differentiated as fiction, and do need an adult to explain the difference.
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#2  Jellby 07-29-2019, 08:45 AM
It seems "M. Bowley" could be Sophia May Bowley https://wingsofwhimsy.wordpress.com/2016/12/31/new-years-children-by-sophia-may-bowley/ (1864-1960), in which case her illustrations are not public domain in life+70 countries yet.
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