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(US specific) 80% of books published 1924-63 allegedly in public domain
#11  gweeks 08-06-2019, 10:41 AM
Quote shalym
Robert Heinlein's book "Beyond This Horizon" seems to have the same issue. It was originally published in two parts in a magazine under his "Anson MacDonald" pseudonym. A few years later, it was published as a novel with added material. As far as I can tell, the original was never renewed, only the novel version.

If anyone can find information to refute this, it would be welcome!

Shari
The serial was renewed. The numbers are R462341-462342.

Quote
Beyond this horizon. (In Astounding
science fiction. Apr.-May 1942)
20Mar42, B535871; 17Apr42,
B540404. Robert A. Heinlein (A);
26May69; R462341-462342.
Greg
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#12  shalym 08-06-2019, 11:38 AM
Quote gweeks
The serial was renewed. The numbers are R462341-462342.

Greg
Thanks!

Shari
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#13  gweeks 08-06-2019, 12:55 PM
Quote shalym
Thanks!

Shari
The only Heinlein that I know of that's PD in the US is Heil! (Successful Operation) as a short in Futuria Fantasia April 1940 where FF was published without a copyright notice.

https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/41651

Greg
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#14  Arbait 08-10-2019, 04:59 PM
Yes, US specific, in the rest of the world, EU, the same book is still life of author+70 years...
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#15  Rand Brittain 08-11-2019, 12:50 PM
That article has a bunch of links. Where's the easiest place to search this database?

It would be lovely if Lud-in-the-mist could finally escape copyright hell.
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#16  Pulpmeister 08-11-2019, 11:01 PM
There are a huge number of sf short stories and even novels on Gutenberg (USA) which went out of copyright because the author failed to renew the copyrights under the USA's old 28 years plus renewal system.

Many writers of that era didn't expect that their stories would ever be published again, didn't understand copyright law, and let their stuff lapse. Randall Garrett is one such writer. The exact opposite is Asimov, very organised, who seems to have let only one story lapse, "Youth", which is on Project Gutenberg USA.

This is also true of novels, the vast majority of which sold out their initial print runs (if they were lucky!), saw no second edition, and were never heard of again. If it takes five or six years to sell a 1,500 copy print run, the author and publisher wouldn't have been the slightest interested in renewal many years later.

I sometimes think that the 28 years plus renewal system of the USA was the best of the bunch.

Of course, these stories are only PD in USA.
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#17  pdurrant 08-12-2019, 04:24 AM
Quote haertig
I would assume books are similar to music. You have a copyright for the original manuscript, and then a separate copyright for the editing/publishing step.
Some countries have a 'typographic copyright', which protects the specific page layout, so that an edition can't simply be copied wholesale, but must be reset.

In the UK, "Copyright in the typographical arrangement of a published edition expires at the end of the period of 25 years from the end of the calendar year in which the edition was first published. "
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#18  pwalker8 08-12-2019, 08:30 AM
Quote Pulpmeister
...
I sometimes think that the 28 years plus renewal system of the USA was the best of the bunch.

...
I would be happy with that system. I would even be fine with a tiered approach that allows those rare works that continue to have significant commercial value 56 years later to extend that copyright. I suspect that having an official copyright database, rather than automatic copyright, and a requirement to renew every 10 years would clear up a lot of the mess. I would trade that for a longer copyright period for those rare works that still have significant commercial value 50 years after publishing. Add in a requirement that all copyright works much be submitted in an approved electronic format and I would consider that a huge improvement over what we currently have.
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#19  crich70 08-15-2019, 03:15 AM
Quote SteveEisenberg
I downloaded the substantial free sample. They claim a 2017 copyright, saying in the notice that "some additional notes and clarifications have been added for the modern reader's benefit." However, skimming through the sample, I couldn't find anything that looked like a footnote. So I'm wondering if there was a good faith effort to produce a enhanced version, or just a de minimis effort to guard against someone + appropriating their proofreading job.

Usually, a really enhanced modern version of a classic will have a new introduction. None in this one.
Ah, but you said you downloaded the 'free sample' which is certainly less than the full text. It's possible that the additions are in the portions of the book that you didn't get in the sample. I think it's around 10% or less of a book when you get a sample so that leaves up to 90% of the book in which the additional material may be included.
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#20  crich70 08-15-2019, 03:18 AM
Quote Pulpmeister
There are a huge number of sf short stories and even novels on Gutenberg (USA) which went out of copyright because the author failed to renew the copyrights under the USA's old 28 years plus renewal system.

Many writers of that era didn't expect that their stories would ever be published again, didn't understand copyright law, and let their stuff lapse. Randall Garrett is one such writer. The exact opposite is Asimov, very organised, who seems to have let only one story lapse, "Youth", which is on Project Gutenberg USA.

This is also true of novels, the vast majority of which sold out their initial print runs (if they were lucky!), saw no second edition, and were never heard of again. If it takes five or six years to sell a 1,500 copy print run, the author and publisher wouldn't have been the slightest interested in renewal many years later.

I sometimes think that the 28 years plus renewal system of the USA was the best of the bunch.

Of course, these stories are only PD in USA.
And the old Sci Fi stories among others were written in a time when the author's were lucky to get 1 cent a word so that they didn't get very much $ for a given story. Of course since many were written during the depression any $ was better than none.
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