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Books UnBanned: Brooklyn Public Library
#1  Catlady 04-23-2022, 11:04 AM
Brooklyn Public Library is offering FREE digital library cards nationwide to anyone aged 13-21 for a limited time, to combat book banning. BPL's usual fee for out-of-state residents is $50.

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The card will be good for one year and is designed to complement access to resources for teens in their local communities. The Brooklyn Public Library eCard provides access to 350,00 e-books; 200,000 audiobooks and over 100 databases. Teens will also be connected to their peers in Brooklyn, including members of BPL’s Intellectual Freedom Teen Council, to help one another with information and resources to fight censorship, book recommendations and the defense of freedom to read.
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#2  Paperbackstash 05-06-2022, 10:22 PM
Nice idea.
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#3  bcbob 05-28-2022, 10:37 PM
they actually carry Abigail Shrier's book "irreversible damage", which is often banned. good library.
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#4  Renate 06-03-2022, 07:41 PM
I just coughed up $50 for a regular out-of-state library card.
Besides some hiccups getting it started I've been pleased with it and the availability of books vs. the long wait times for my regular library.
I'm about a factor of three outside the age range for a free card anyway.
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#5  joblack 06-07-2022, 08:02 AM
Quote bcbob
they actually carry Abigail Shrier's book "irreversible damage", which is often banned. good library.

Good to know.
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#6  simmias 06-07-2022, 08:29 PM
Quote Renate
I just coughed up $50 for a regular out-of-state library card.
Besides some hiccups getting it started I've been pleased with it and the availability of books vs. the long wait times for my regular library.
I'm about a factor of three outside the age range for a free card anyway.
I've done the same for a few years now and have recommended them to friends and family. They also let you recommend ebooks and audiobooks for the library to buy, and they've bought quite a few that I've recommended.
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#7  Clort 06-12-2022, 12:16 PM
I know only bad people banned books in the past.
But isn't the banning nowadays good?
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#8  meeera 06-12-2022, 12:18 PM
Quote Clort
I know only bad people banned books in the past.
But isn't the banning nowadays good?
Is this a clumsy attempt at satire? Or something else?
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#9  Renate 06-12-2022, 01:42 PM
Quote simmias
They also let you recommend ebooks and audiobooks for the library to buy, and they've bought quite a few that I've recommended.
I've been quite disappointed myself. Whether recommending books through the OverDrive web interface or sending emails directly to the library I've never seen any result.
(Most grating, three copies of the first volume of a trilogy and zero additional volumes!)
As somebody who knows something about libraries, I realize they can't accept random physical donations (someone's hand-written 20 volume autobiography) and for different reasons (ownership and DRM) random digital donations.
Yet I don't know what the cost to a library it is to procure the rights to a digital asset. Is it the same cost as for you and me?
I sent an email to my library. "You have this book in the 3rd edition. I'll donate $50 if you'll buy the 5th edition." No reply.
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#10  DNSB 06-12-2022, 04:22 PM
Quote Renate
Yet I don't know what the cost to a library it is to procure the rights to a digital asset. Is it the same cost as for you and me?
I sent an email to my library. "You have this book in the 3rd edition. I'll donate $50 if you'll buy the 5th edition." No reply.
The cost to the library is considerably higher than the cost to you as an individual and the library copy comes with restrictions on the maximum number of loans (50 -100 are common) and, for many publishers, a limit on the length of the license (1 or 2 years is common). One sample that I ran into was an ebook that is sold on Kobo or Amazon for $14.99 US but costs the library $84 US for a 52 loan/2 year license (whichever comes first). This means that many libraries can not afford to keep ebooks that are not popular after the loan count/time expires so no searching for backlist items at most libraries.

One chart I ran into for the Big 5 was:
At my local library, one recent horrible example was an ebook that was priced at $104.29 Cdn with a 52 loan limit/2 year limit so the library would be paying ~$2 or more per loan. The same book from Kobo or Amazon Canada was on sale for $9.99 Cdn.
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