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New Leaf Nominations for June 2019 • Into the Labyrinth: The Quest
#11  Catlady 05-01-2019, 12:18 PM
My take on "quest" is a quest for justice. But I haven't quite found what I'm looking for.
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#12  CRussel 05-01-2019, 12:19 PM
My problem with quest books, which are the only ones coming to mind initially, are that they inevitably seem to be trilogies or worse -- hardly appropriate. OTOH, perhaps something like Bill Bryson's A Walk in the Woods? It's only 320 pages, and is under $8 USD. Oh, and was a quite enjoyable read when I listened to it a couple of years ago.
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#13  Dazrin 05-01-2019, 12:35 PM
I'm struggling too. I had one book in mind that is tangentially related to the theme (mostly I'm trying to fit it somewhere) but it is less than a year old anyway and a bit on the expensive side still. I should be able to fit it into one of the new themes after it is old enough (and hopefully less expensive).

For ideas, I am more focusing on the "Quest" part of the theme. Maybe a good telling of the search for the Holy Grail, or the seach for the Lost City of Gold, Shangri-La, or King Solomon's Mines? Something where the protagonists have a definite goal.
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#14  Catlady 05-01-2019, 01:27 PM
I'm nominating Human Game: The True Story of the 'Great Escape' Murders and the Hunt for the Gestapo Gunmen (2013) by Simon Read. (Subtitle is Hunting the Great Escape Murderers in some countries.)

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In March and April of 1944, Gestapo gunmen killed fifty POWs—a brutal act in defiance of international law and the Geneva Convention.

This is the true story of the men who hunted them down.

The mass breakout of seventy-six Allied airmen from the infamous Stalag Luft III became one of the greatest tales of World War II, immortalized in the film The Great Escape. But where Hollywood’s depiction fades to black, another incredible story begins . . .

Not long after the escape, fifty of the recaptured airmen were taken to desolate killing fields throughout Germany and shot on the direct orders of Hitler. When the nature of these killings came to light, Churchill’s government swore to pursue justice at any cost. A revolving team of military police, led by squadron leader Francis P. McKenna, was dispatched to Germany seventeen months after the killings to pick up a trail long gone cold.

Amid the chaos of postwar Germany, divided between American, British, French, and Russian occupiers, McKenna and his men brought twenty-one Gestapo killers to justice in a hunt that spanned three years and took them into the darkest realms of Nazi fanaticism.

In Human Game, Simon Read tells this harrowing story as never before. Beginning inside Stalag Luft III and the Nazi High Command, through the grueling three-year manhunt, and into the final close of the case more than two decades later, Read delivers a clear-eyed and meticulously researched account of this often-overlooked saga of hard-won justice.
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In March 1944, 76 Allied officers tunnelled out of Stalag Luft III. Of the 73 captured, 50 were shot by direct order of Hitler. This is the story of how a British Bobby from Blackpool, Frank McKenna, was sent to post-war Germany on the express orders from Churchill to bring the Gestapo murderers to justice.

In a quest that ranges from the devastated, bombed out cities of Europe to the horrors of the concentrations camps, McKenna is relentless in his pursuit. A gripping read set in the aftermath of World War II.

Amazon US, $12.99

Kobo US, $12.99
Kobo Canada, CDN $13.99
Kobo Australia, AU $8.99
Kobo NZ, NZ $9.99
Kobo UK, £3.99

Audiobook and e-book available in Overdrive.
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#15  issybird 05-01-2019, 03:06 PM
It's awfully tempting to nominate this:

The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code

It couldn't be a better fit by name, I own it and I'd like to read it. However, it's a little on the pricey side and popular history books haven't worked out that well for us. But I haven't entirely eliminated it from consideration.
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#16  issybird 05-01-2019, 03:16 PM
Quote Catlady
I'm nominating Human Game: The True Story of the 'Great Escape' Murders and the Hunt for the Gestapo Gunmen (2013) by Simon Read. (Subtitle is Hunting the Great Escape Murderers in some countries.).
The Great Escape is a book I read and reread as a kid; I wouldn't need to refresh my memory of it. None of my ten OD libraries has it, but I note that it's cheap in the UK.
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#17  Victoria 05-01-2019, 03:31 PM
I’ve focused on the adventure of navigating a labyrinth, and nominate Michael Palin’s caper, Around The World In Eighty Days. It’s from the travel diary that Palin kept during the 1989 BBC series of the same name. In the spirit of duplicating travel conditions at the time of Fogg’s adventure, no air travel was allowed on Palin’s quest.

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Amazon: “Following the route taken by Phileas Fogg 115 years earlier, Michael Palin set out from the Reform Club to circumnavigate the world. The rules were simple, but nothing else about the trip was straightforward...

From a tour of Venice on a rubbish barge to ship spotting at the Suez Canal and the bicycle rush hour and snake snacks in China, this is an unparalleled tribute to man's ability to make life difficult for himself.”
Palin’s book got a 4.4 rating on Amazon, and a 3.99 rating at Goodreads, and a 4 with Kobo (but Kobo only had 2 reviewers ).I debated whether to nominate this or Jules Verne's original, partly because I suspect Palin’s book may be a light read. However, some reviewers raised the issue of racism in Verne’s treatment of other cultures.

In the end, I landed on Palin’s diary because the documentary was one of my favourite BBC productions, I thought this might be fun to read, and travel could spark some lively discussions.

Samples Kobo: $6 US; $6 CDN; £6 UK; $17 New Zealand; $14 Australia
Samples Kindle $5 US; $6 CAD; £6UK; $5 New Zealand; $15 Australia
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#18  Victoria 05-01-2019, 03:37 PM
Quote Dazrin
I'm struggling too. I had one book in mind that is tangentially related to the theme (mostly I'm trying to fit it somewhere) but it is less than a year old anyway and a bit on the expensive side still. I should be able to fit it into one of the new themes after it is old enough (and hopefully less expensive).

For ideas, I am more focusing on the "Quest" part of the theme. Maybe a good telling of the search for the Holy Grail, or the seach for the Lost City of Gold, Shangri-La, or King Solomon's Mines? Something where the protagonists have a definite goal.
I thought about Lost Horizon and Shangri-La too. Something about that legend is so alluring and really captures the imagination.

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Originally Posted by issybird It's awfully tempting to nominate this:

The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code

It couldn't be a better fit by name, I own it and I'd like to read it. However, it's a little on the pricey side and popular history books haven't worked out that well for us. But I haven't entirely eliminated it from consideration.
I think it sounds fascinating. I’m excited to follow up, even if you don’t nominate it. Thanks.
(Edit - just wanted to pass on that a number of reviewers found it difficult to see the symbols / text on the kindle version)
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#19  Catlady 05-01-2019, 04:19 PM
Quote issybird
It's awfully tempting to nominate this:

The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code

It couldn't be a better fit by name, I own it and I'd like to read it. However, it's a little on the pricey side and popular history books haven't worked out that well for us. But I haven't entirely eliminated it from consideration.
When I looked this up at my library, I was intrigued by another book from this author: Conan Doyle for the Defense: The True Story of a Sensational British Murder, a Quest for Justice, and the World's Most Famous Detective Writer. Its publication date would put it thisclose to being eligible for June.
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#20  Victoria 05-01-2019, 04:19 PM
Quote Catlady
I'm nominating Human Game: The True Story of the 'Great Escape' Murders and the Hunt for the Gestapo Gunmen (2013) by Simon Read. (Subtitle is Hunting the Great Escape Murderers in some countries.)






Amazon US, $12.99

Kobo US, $12.99
Kobo Canada, CDN $13.99
Kobo Australia, AU $8.99
Kobo NZ, NZ $9.99
Kobo UK, £3.99

Audiobook and e-book available in Overdrive.
A quest for justice - such an excellent interpretation of the theme! And it fits it literally as well. I heard stories about this growing up, because a friend of our family was a POW in that camp. He had tuberculosis and was in an isolation unit, so didn’t participate at all. However apparently a Acadian man from the village next to ours was there as well, and was involved in helping to plan. He was later invited to see the premiere of the movie, when it came out.
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