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New Leaf Nominations for September 2019 • Labour of Love: Working Class
#41  Victoria 08-05-2019, 08:21 PM
Quote issybird
DT = Dead Tree, i.e., paper.
Thanks! Shoudda got that
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#42  issybird 08-06-2019, 08:28 AM
We've got a day to go and there are a lot of nominations still in hand, in case anyone has had a last minute light bulb moment about the perfect book.
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#43  Catlady 08-06-2019, 06:13 PM
Even though it's late, I've decided to go ahead and nominate John Steinbeck's In Dubious Battle (1936, 302 pp.).

Quote
At once a relentlessly fast-paced, admirably observed novel of social unrest and the story of a young man's struggle for identity, In Dubious Battle is set in the California apple country, where a strike by migrant workers against rapacious landowners spirals out of control, as a principled defiance metamorphoses into blind fanaticism. Caught in the upheaval is Jim Nolan, a once aimless man who find himself in the course of the strike, briefly becomes its leader, and is ultimately crushed in its service.
Amazon U.S., $12.99

Both e-book and audiobook are in Overdrive and available in all relevant countries. There's also a copy of the e-book at the Internet Archive.
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#44  gmw 08-08-2019, 12:35 AM
Quote Victoria
Quote issybird
DT = Dead Tree, i.e., paper.
Thanks! Shoudda got that
Well it could have been "Dear Text" - in either expensive or cherished sense, both would work for various paper books I have here.
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#45  Victoria 08-08-2019, 02:02 PM
Quote gmw
Well it could have been "Dear Text" - in either expensive or cherished sense, both would work for various paper books I have here.
Good one! I’ve got too many of both sorts myself.
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#46  issybird 02-02-2020, 08:49 AM
It can take me a while, but I do get around to interesting also-rans.

Quote Catlady
I wanted to nominate Never Done: A History of American Housework by Susan Strasser, but it's not available everywhere.
Spoiler Warning below






Never Done is the first history of American housework. Beginning with a description of household chores of the nineteenth century--cooking at fireplaces and on cast-iron stoves, laundry done with wash boilers and flatirons, endless water hauling and fire tending--Susan Strasser demonstrates how industrialization transformed the nature of women's work. Lightening some tasks and eliminating the need for others, new commercial processes inexorably altered women's daily lives and relationships--with each other and with the people they served.

In this lively and authoritative book, Strasser weaves together the history of material advances and discussions of domestic service, "women's separate sphere" and the impact of advertising, home economics and women's entry into the workforce.

Hailed as pathbreaking when originally published, Never Done remains an eye-opening examination of daily life in the American past.
I'm just finishing this up and it's excellent. Interesting and informative, it was a very good read. While I was aware of the backbreaking nature of housework and even women's demotion from equal partner in a subsistence economy to something rather contemptible, I didn't really see all the aspects of housework in the economy as a whole. Very glad to have read this; a terrific almost-nomination!
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