Mobileread
Critique my first audiobook recording?
#1  newshirt 01-03-2020, 12:13 PM
Would anyone care to critique my first recording? (see link below) I hope to begin uploading to ACX soon, but need to ensure my performance is good enough. Got any input?

BTW, I wrote this book, and will be recording it myself.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ce7euaiedz3rc6t/ch3.mp3?dl=0
Reply 

#2  arjaybe 01-03-2020, 03:03 PM
It sounds fine to me. A little more than a straight reading, but not overdone.
Reply 

#3  newshirt 01-07-2020, 12:42 PM
Any other comments? Observations?
Reply 

#4  BookCat 01-09-2020, 06:38 AM
Because you've given no context, no blurb of any kind, I'm not sure whether the tone of voice is "in character". If this is the case, he comes across as overbearing.

Maybe it's because I'm used to soft asmr readings, but I found it a bit 'shouty'. You'd be great at reading something like Huck Finn.

Some context would be useful.
Reply 

#5  Uncle Robin 01-09-2020, 10:10 AM
I have an atavistic antipathy to audiobooks (possibly because I have an even more averse reaction to asmr) but as an exercise, I listened to your sample. I found it nicely balanced, agreeing with the comment above "A little more than a straight reading, but not overdone." Since it is said that praise from one's enemy may be more valuable than that from a friend, have this audiobook anti-fan's "well done"
Reply 

#6  arjaybe 01-09-2020, 01:40 PM
By asmr, do you mean

Quote
Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is an experience characterized by a static-like or tingling sensation on the skin that typically begins on the scalp and moves down the back of the neck...
?
Reply 

#7  Uncle Robin 01-09-2020, 04:17 PM
Quote arjaybe
By asmr, do you mean
?
I do, or more specifically, to recordings made with the intent of triggering asmr. The previous respondent's comment that they are used to asmr recordings made me wonder if that might be why I dislike audiobooks so intensely. Every time I listen to/watch recordings made to give an asmr effect, it's like chalk scraped across a chalkboard for me, I can't stand more thana few seconds' worth. If many audiobooks ae made with the itnent of triggering asmr, the reason for my aversion is clear.
Reply 

#8  arjaybe 01-09-2020, 04:46 PM
Quote Uncle Robin
I do, or more specifically, to recordings made with the intent of triggering asmr. The previous respondent's comment that they are used to asmr recordings made me wonder if that might be why I dislike audiobooks so intensely. Every time I listen to/watch recordings made to give an asmr effect, it's like chalk scraped across a chalkboard for me, I can't stand more thana few seconds' worth. If many audiobooks ae made with the itnent of triggering asmr, the reason for my aversion is clear.
I had no idea people were recording audiobooks with that purpose.
Reply 

#9  Uncle Robin 01-09-2020, 04:50 PM
Quote arjaybe
I had no idea people were recording audiobooks with that purpose.
Neither did I, but the previous commenter said
Quote
"I'm used to soft asmr readings"
so I assume they must be quite common.
Reply 

#10  VydorScope 01-09-2020, 07:22 PM
Quote newshirt
Would anyone care to critique my first recording? (see link below) I hope to begin uploading to ACX soon, but need to ensure my performance is good enough. Got any input?

BTW, I wrote this book, and will be recording it myself.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ce7euaiedz3rc6t/ch3.mp3?dl=0
Disclaimer: I only listened to a short segment from the middle.

Okay, I listen to 1000s of hours of audiobooks and pay professional narrators to produce mine which I help edit. So I guess that makes me an "expert" in this. So here are my thoughts:

For a straight read, you did very well. It is clear and your diction is good. You have done well in eliminating background noise and the overall technical quality of the sound is good.

However, what you did not do is perform. Unless this is non-fiction, readers typically expect voice actors. They expect emotion in the dialog. They expect volume and pitch to change like it would if it was on stage. They also expect different people to sound at least a little different so that they know who is talking without having to wait for the "said Bob" to tell them. In writing the format of the text gives them those clues, in audio, you have to do that with your voice.

So it comes down to your goal. Do you want to read this like a non-fiction book, or like audio entertainment? If the former, then carry on - you are nailing it. If the latter, well I would scrub that take and try again.

Voice acting is HARD. I have considered doing my own books many times since the price ranges into the many thousands to produce just one book but man it is HARD to do well. For a professional, the rule of thumb is that you can count on 4 to 7 hours of work to produce 1 finished hour of audio. That should give you an idea of the scale of the task you take on by doing it yourself.

Not saying that you should not do it, just trying to help you understand what you are taking on.

Good luck!
Reply 

  Next »  Last »  (1/2)
Today's Posts | Search this Thread | Login | Register